addiction recovery addiction recovery

Barb Williamson runs several sobriety houses in Pennsylvania, commercially run homes where residents support each other in their recovery from opioid addiction. Initially, she says, she saw the use of Suboxone or methadone by residents as "a crutch," and banned them. But evidence the medicines can be helpful changed her mind. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Many 'Recovery Houses' Won't Let Residents Use Medicine To Quit Opioids

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Bea and Doug Duncan outside their home in Natick, Mass. The coaching they got from the Community Reinforcement and Family Training program, they say, gave them tools to help their son Jeff stick to his recovery from drug use. He's 28 now and has been sober for nine years. Robin Lubbbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbbock/WBUR