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Winnie the Pooh: Blood and Honey was initially approved by Chinese officials to screen at more than 30 cinemas in Hong Kong and Macau on Thursday. But days ahead of the screening, the film's distribution company was told it was no longer allowed to show the slasher film starring a murderous Winnie the Pooh. Chen Cici/AP hide caption

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Chen Cici/AP

Visitors to a cinema showing the latest "Minions: The Rise of Gru" movie get their tickets checked in Beijing. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Opinion: In China, movie villains don't get away

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A paramilitary police officer talks next to a screen showing frontier soldiers of the People's Liberation Army during an event at a primary school in Wuzhishan, Hainan province, China, on Feb. 22. On the screen are (L-R) Qi Fabao, who was seriously wounded in the border clash with Indian troops in June last year, and four who were killed: Chen Hongjun, Chen Xiangrong, Xiao Siyuan and Wang Zhuoran. China Daily/via Reuters hide caption

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China Daily/via Reuters

Owned by Tencent, one of China's biggest companies, the WeChat app has more than 1 billion monthly users in China and now serves users outside the country, too. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

China Intercepts WeChat Texts From U.S. And Abroad, Researchers Say

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A protester shows a placard to travelers at Hong Kong International Airport on Wednesday. Flight operations resumed at the airport Wednesday morning after two days of disruptions. Vincent Thian/AP hide caption

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Vincent Thian/AP

Tibetans cheer on a Tibetan team at a soccer tournament in London. Fans say they were pleased and surprised that the tournament organizers didn't succumb to pressure from potential sponsors and dump the Tibetan team to avoid angering the Chinese government. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

How The Chinese Government Works To Censor Debate In Western Democracies

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