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Scholars Susan Ashbrook Harvey, left, and Robin Darling Young became 'sworn siblings' after an ancient ritual at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Keren Carrion/NPR; Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrion/NPR; Jodi Hilton for NPR

How two good friends became sworn siblings — with the revival of an ancient ritual

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Fragile Cargo recounts Chinese curators' efforts to rescue priceless artworks ahead of and during war with Japan in the 1930s. It's the first time the story has been told in English. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

A megaphone facing the Chinese mainland marks the tourist location of the Beishan Broadcasting Wall, which Taiwan used for broadcasting propaganda to mainland China, is seen on April 8, in Kinmen, Taiwan. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

How Taiwan used women's voices to send secret messages into China and woo defectors

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A photo taken during a government organized media tour this spring shows a class in the China Executive Leadership Academy in Yan'an, the headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party from 1936 to 1947, in Shaanxi province. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

How China's Communist Party Schools Train Generations Of Loyal Members

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Japanese troops enter Manchuria in 1933. Tokyo sent soldiers and settlers to Manchuria and exerted direct and indirect influence there. Japanese official publications treated Manchuria's people much in the same way as China's Xinhua News Agency now treats those of Xinjiang and Tibet. Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images