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Psychologist Phil Tetlock thinks the parable of the fox and the hedgehog represents two different cognitive styles. "The hedgehogs are more the big idea people, more decisive," while the foxes are more accepting of nuance, more open to using different approaches with different problems. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

Dr. Brian Chesebro (right), in Portland, Ore., has calculated that by simply using the anesthesia gas sevoflurane in most surgeries, instead of the similar gas desflurane, he can significantly cut the amount of global warming each procedure contributes to the environment. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Effects Of Surgery On A Warming Planet: Can Anesthesia Go Green?

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The North American porcupine has a cute face, but it has upward of 30,000 menacing quills covering much of its body. The slow-moving herbivore uses them as a last-resort defense against predators. Lindsay Wildlife Experience hide caption

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Lindsay Wildlife Experience

The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Evan Atar Adaha, surgeon and medical director at a hospital in South Sudan, accepts the U.N.'s Nansen Refugee Award in Geneva, on October 1. His wife, Angela Atar, is at right. Cyril Zingaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cyril Zingaro/AFP/Getty Images