lion air lion air
Stories About

lion air

A Boeing 737 Max airliner is shown at the Boeing Factory in Renton, Wash., in November. European aviation regulators gave the all-clear to return to service following a pair of deadly crashes in 2018 and 2019. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max that crashed near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in March 2019. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mulugeta Ayene/AP

Boeing To Pay $2.5 Billion Settlement Over Deadly 737 Max Crashes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/954782512/954809103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Boeing Company President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg, right, and Boeing Commercial Airplanes Vice President and Chief Engineer John Hamilton faced intense questioning about what the company knew and when. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Relatives of passengers of the crashed Lion Air jet check personal belongings retrieved from the waters where the airplane crashed, at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, last October. Tatan Syuflana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tatan Syuflana/AP

Analysts say Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg and the company were slow to take responsibility in the crashes of two 737 Max planes within months of each other. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713483867/713799022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane sits on the assembly line on March 27, in Renton, Wash. Boeing is slowing production of its grounded Max airliner while it works on fixing flight-control software in the wake of fatal crashes. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 sits grounded in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in March. Ethiopian officials on Thursday released the initial report into last month's crash of a Max 8. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mulugeta Ayene/AP

At a Senate hearing March 27, Daniel Elwell, acting director of the Federal Aviation Administration, said airline pilots had enough training to handle Boeing's flight control software. But some pilots disagree. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/709487222/709998497" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On the day of the Lion Air crash, Verian Utama (left) was traveling on the flight with a former pro rider named Andrea Manfredi (right), a friend who also perished. Courtesy of Verian Utama's family hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Verian Utama's family

For Family Of A Lion Air Crash Victim, 'The Happiness Is Gone'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707509415/707509416" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump plans to nominate Stephen Dickson to lead the Federal Aviation Administration. The agency is under scrutiny for its response to two crashes of Boeing 737 airplanes, which are pictured here outside Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash., on March 14. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Nurcahyo Utomo, an investigator for Indonesia's National Transportation Safety Committee, speaks at a news conference in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Wednesday, about preliminary findings from the investigation into the crash of Lion Air Flight 610. Achmad Ibrahim/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Achmad Ibrahim/AP

Families of victims of Lion Air Flight JT610 attend a meeting with authorities and Lion Air management on Monday in Jakarta, Indonesia. All 189 passengers and crew are feared to have died when the plane crashed shortly after takeoff on Oct. 29. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images