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Florida voting rights

Kent Fuchs, the president of the University of Florida, delivers comments during a ceremony in Gainesville, Fla., on Sept. 15. Brad McClenny/The Gainesville Sun via Imagn Content Services, LLC/USA TODAY NETWORK via Reuters hide caption

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Brad McClenny/The Gainesville Sun via Imagn Content Services, LLC/USA TODAY NETWORK via Reuters

Mike Bloomberg, then a Democratic presidential candidate, speaks at a news conference in March in Miami's Little Havana neighborhood. Bloomberg has helped raise money to pay off felons' fines so they can vote in Florida. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Florida Republicans Take Aim At Efforts To Pay Felons' Fines So They Can Vote

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People gathered around the Ben & Jerry's "Yes on 4" truck in Miami as they learned about Amendment 4 and ate free ice cream. Floridians voted in November to automatically restore voting rights to most felons after they complete their sentences and probation. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Jessica Jones (center) speaks to people gathered around the Ben & Jerry's "Yes on 4" Truck about Florida's Amendment 4 initiative at Charles Hadley Park in Miami, on Oct. 22. Amendment 4 asked voters to restore the voting rights of people with past felony convictions. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP