migrant caravan migrant caravan
Stories About

migrant caravan

Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

toggle caption
Federica Valabrega

When thousands of Hondurans and other Central Americans poured into Tijuana, Aguilar knew he had to do something. "They're from the same streets and cities as us. They're family!" he says. "It wasn't up for discussion, it was simply a matter of going out there and getting these people fed with a taste of home." Tomás Ayuso for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tomás Ayuso for NPR

Juan Antonio Hernández, the brother of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández and a former congressman, was arrested in Miami on Friday. He is accused of collaborating with multiple criminal organizations in Honduras, Colombia and Mexico to smuggle tons of cocaine into the U.S. Orlanda Sierra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Orlanda Sierra/AFP/Getty Images

Migrants walk to the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico, last week to make requests for political asylum. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Administration Faces 2 Legal Challenges For Asylum Restrictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668824846/669404142" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A group of mostly LGBT Central American migrants are the first to reach northern Mexico. On Sunday about 80 of them arrived in Tijuana. They plan to apply for asylum as early as Thursday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rodrigo Abd/AP

Migrants from Central America ride in a truck Monday as they travel toward the U.S. on the Mexico City-Puebla highway. Thursday, the Trump administration issued new a new rule for asylum-seekers. Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rodrigo Arangua/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Seeks To Limit Asylum-Seekers With New Rule

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/665875770/665931231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sister Bertha Lopez Chaves applies anti-inflammatory eyedrops to a migrant at a stadium in Mexico City where the caravan is resting. Her order is one of roughly 50 groups giving aid to the migrants in the Mexican capital. "We're just trying to deal with their basic needs so they can continue on," she says. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
James Fredrick for NPR