camp fire camp fire
Stories About

camp fire

A homemade sign hangs on the fence surrounded Paradise Elementary School. The school was destroyed by the fire and the rubble is now being bulldozed and cleaned up. Michelle Wiley/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Michelle Wiley/KQED

6 Months After Paradise Burned, Trauma Endures For Kids And Adults

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721834022/722389831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A burned-out property sits next to a home that's still standing near Paradise six months after the Camp Fire. The fire was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

More Than 1,000 Families Still Searching For Homes 6 Months After The Camp Fire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721057281/721329231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Anderson is a property owner and builder in Paradise, Calif. He expects the housing market to eventually come back after the Camp Fire burned nearly 90 percent of the town to the ground. Marc Albert/North State Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Marc Albert/North State Public Radio

Rebuilding Paradise, One New Home At A Time

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/704124239/705021510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cal Poly architecture students focused on reimagining and rebuilding Paradise, Calif., by presenting models, renderings and updated concepts during a community forum in Chico, Calif. Jason Halley, CSU, Chico hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Halley, CSU, Chico

'Reimagining Paradise' — Making Plans To Rebuild A Town Destroyed By Wildfire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700825538/701671652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A vehicle rests in front of a home leveled by the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif., in a photo from December. Pacific Gas & Electric says its equipment may have ignited the 2018 fire. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Noah Berger/AP

Chico Housing Action Team organizers Leslie Johnson, left, Charles Withuhn, center, and Bill Kurnizki, right, in the field in south Chico where they plan to soon break ground on a 33-unit tiny home community for homeless adults called Simplicity Village. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Westervelt/NPR

Tiny Homes For Homeless Get The Go-Ahead In The Wake of California's Worst Wildfire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/694863105/695662956" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tom and Tamara Conry stand outside their home in Paradise, Calif., which was almost untouched by November's deadly Camp Fire. Their property insurer notified them in December that it would not renew their policy past January. Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio

Their Home Survived The Camp Fire — But Their Insurance Did Not

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695205917/695536933" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Camp Fire burned so hot and intense there is little remaining in the mountains near Concow, Calif. Residents would like to camp out on their properties, but the federal government says they have to wait until toxic debris is cleared. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Residents Of Paradise And Other Towns Destroyed By Wildfire Must Wait To Go Home

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692724203/692811479" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

After the Camp Fire in November, thousands of people whose homes were destroyed were forced to seek refuge in nearby Chico, Calif. Some 700 people, some in their RVs, are still living at a Red Cross shelter at the Chico fairgrounds. The shelter is expected to close at the end of January. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Siegler/NPR

In The Aftermath Of The Camp Fire, A Slow, Simmering Crisis In Nearby Chico

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/685137701/685434162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

California utility PG&E Corp. said Monday that it plans to file for bankruptcy over what it estimates could be $30 billion in potential liability costs from recent wildfires. Here, transmission towers in a valley near Paradise, Calif., as the Camp Fire burns in November 2018. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Youth pastor Kyle Smith of First Assembly of God Paradise reads from the Bible on his phone because his copy of the book burned in the Camp Fire. His congregation is one of several now worshiping with congregations in Chico. Polly Stryker/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Polly Stryker/KQED

'Blessings Come In' As Churches Take In Refugee Congregations After The Camp Fire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/679369796/679592594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nathaniel Smith and Miykael Goodwin have a band name now, Cold Weather Sons, and a professionally produced single, "One of These Days." The song is a lament for the town lost to the Camp Fire in 2018. Courtesy Cold Weather Sons hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Cold Weather Sons

A Song Of Tribute To The Lost Town Of Paradise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676226073/676346849" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vehicles pass each other on a flooded street in Chico, Calif. Flash flooding hit a wildfire-scarred area of Northern California on Thursday, forcing officials to deploy swift water rescue teams to save people stuck in vehicles and rescue them from homes after a downpour near the Paradise area. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Bob Wilson, a San Diego real estate developer and restaurant owner, hands out $1,000 checks to students and staff from Paradise High School on Tuesday evening in Chico, Calif. The town of Paradise was largely destroyed by a wildfire this month. Loren Lighthall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Loren Lighthall/AP

Kimberly Spainhower hugs her daughter Chloe, 13, while her husband Ryan Spainhower searches through the ashes of their burned home in Paradise, Calif., last week. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

A member of a search and rescue team combs the ruins of a mobile home park Wednesday in Paradise, Calif. Hundreds of people remain missing, and survivors are struggling to cope with life after escaping the Camp Fire. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A holiday mug is seen among the wreckage of what was once someone's kitchen in Paradise, California. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Hu/NPR

Thousands Of Fire Evacuees To Spend The Holiday Without Homes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/669812978/669891753" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript