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paradise

Bottaro recognizes that the trees around her house pose a potential fire risk. She says that maintaining the vegetation in the backyard and creating defensible space around the house is one more step toward fire mitigation. Next to her house, the city hired goats to clear away overgrown raspberry bushes in a park. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

After Paradise, Living With Fire Means Redefining Resilience

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Efseaff says this area of land could serve the community in the future as a park and a firebreak. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Rethinking Disaster Recovery After A California Town Is Leveled By Wildfire

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A burned-out property sits next to a home that's still standing near Paradise six months after the Camp Fire. The fire was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

More Than 1,000 Families Still Searching For Homes 6 Months After The Camp Fire

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David Anderson is a property owner and builder in Paradise, Calif. He expects the housing market to eventually come back after the Camp Fire burned nearly 90 percent of the town to the ground. Marc Albert/North State Public Radio hide caption

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Marc Albert/North State Public Radio

Rebuilding Paradise, One New Home At A Time

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Cal Poly architecture students focused on reimagining and rebuilding Paradise, Calif., by presenting models, renderings and updated concepts during a community forum in Chico, Calif. Jason Halley, CSU, Chico hide caption

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Jason Halley, CSU, Chico

'Reimagining Paradise' — Making Plans To Rebuild A Town Destroyed By Wildfire

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Tom and Tamara Conry stand outside their home in Paradise, Calif., which was almost untouched by November's deadly Camp Fire. Their property insurer notified them in December that it would not renew their policy past January. Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio

Their Home Survived The Camp Fire — But Their Insurance Did Not

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Homes leveled by the Camp Fire line Valley Ridge Drive in Paradise, Calif. Some recovery efforts are stalled by the government shutdown, creating anxiety among survivors and concern for officials. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Shutdown Threatens To Stall Recovery In Wildfire-Ravaged Paradise, Calif.

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After the Camp Fire in November, thousands of people whose homes were destroyed were forced to seek refuge in nearby Chico, Calif. Some 700 people, some in their RVs, are still living at a Red Cross shelter at the Chico fairgrounds. The shelter is expected to close at the end of January. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

In The Aftermath Of The Camp Fire, A Slow, Simmering Crisis In Nearby Chico

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Nathaniel Smith and Miykael Goodwin have a band name now, Cold Weather Sons, and a professionally produced single, "One of These Days." The song is a lament for the town lost to the Camp Fire in 2018. Courtesy Cold Weather Sons hide caption

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Courtesy Cold Weather Sons

A Song Of Tribute To The Lost Town Of Paradise

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