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He Jiankui

CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

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Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks at a human genome editing summit in Hong Kong on Nov. 28, 2018. He announced an experiment on twins that raised a range of ethical questions and prompted China's government to vow to punish him. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Gene-Editing Scientist's 'Actions Are A Product Of Modern China'

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