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A Bitcoin ATM is seen at a subway station in Brooklyn Heights in New York City on June 13. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies have plunged in value in recent days. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Why cryptocurrencies have gone from the next hot thing to a full-on meltdown

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A Bitcoin logo is seen during the Bitcoin 2022 Conference at Miami Beach Convention Center in Miami on April 8. Crypto such as Bitcoin have tumbled in recent days as part of a storm hitting all kinds of markets. Marco Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Bello/Getty Images

4 things to know as cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin (and stablecoins) melt down

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A shopper pays with cash back in 2000 in Austin, Texas. Such transactions are less and less common and are likely to become more so if the Federal Reserve adopts a digital version of the dollar. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The U.S. is considering a radical rethinking of the dollar for today's digital world

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Alipay and WeChat QR codes for online payment are displayed at a vegetable stall in Nantong in China's eastern Jiangsu province. Now China's central bank is preparing to test a digital currency. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

China To Test Digital Currency. Could It End Up Challenging The Dollar Globally?

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The Urban Deli cafe in Stockholm no longer accepts cash for any transactions. Going cashless is a growing trend throughout Sweden that some are beginning to question. Maddy Savage for NPR hide caption

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Maddy Savage for NPR

Sweden's Cashless Experiment: Is It Too Much Too Fast?

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