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In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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HHS Secretary Alex Azar at a White House roundtable discussion of health care prices in January. Azar tells NPR his office is now in "active negotiations and discussion" with drugmakers on how to make HIV prevention medicines more available and "cost-effective." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

How HHS Secretary Reconciles Proposed Medicaid Cuts, Stopping The Spread Of HIV

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Shawn Esco brings his dog Nibbler to a park in Jackson, Miss. He was diagnosed with HIV 11 years ago and has stayed healthy, but the same can't be said of many of the other HIV-positive people in his life. L. Kasimu Harris for NPR hide caption

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L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Ending HIV In Mississippi Means Cutting Through Racism, Poverty And Homophobia

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Dr. Michelle Salvaggio, medical director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, points to drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS. Medical advancements since the epidemic surfaced in the 1980s have helped many of her HIV-positive patients lead healthy lives. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

White House Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

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Brittany Williams, a doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia, started taking Truvada when she began dating a man living with HIV. Even though the relationship ended, she continues to take it. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR