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Alexis Perkins, 25, tried to get a prescription for PrEP during a recent visit to her OB-GYN in Atlanta, but her doctor did not feel confident prescribing it. Sam Whitehead/KFF Health News hide caption

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Sam Whitehead/KFF Health News

PrEP prevents HIV infections, but it's not reaching Black women

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President Donald J. Trump touted his plan to end the HIV epidemic during his 2019 State of the Union Address. The effort has sent $1.7 billion mainly to southern states. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Research shows that expanded access to preventive care and coverage has led to an increase in colon cancer screenings, vaccinations, use of contraception and chronic disease screenings. Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm

Apretude, a new drug approved by the FDA this week, is an injection that has proven to be significantly more effective at reducing the risk of sexually-acquired HIV. ViiV Healthcare hide caption

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ViiV Healthcare

A new injection to prevent HIV, rather than pills, is a game changer, scientists say

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A woman receives medication at a clinic offering antiretroviral drugs for HIV patients in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa. STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images

Long-Lasting Anti-AIDS Meds Eliminate 'Psychic Toll' Of Daily Pill

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Truvada is one of two HIV prevention drugs that will be available for free to qualified individuals. BSIP/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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HHS Secretary Alex Azar at a White House roundtable discussion of health care prices in January. Azar tells NPR his office is now in "active negotiations and discussion" with drugmakers on how to make HIV prevention medicines more available and "cost-effective." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

How HHS Secretary Reconciles Proposed Medicaid Cuts, Stopping The Spread Of HIV

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Shawn Esco brings his dog Nibbler to a park in Jackson, Miss. He was diagnosed with HIV 11 years ago and has stayed healthy, but the same can't be said of many of the other HIV-positive people in his life. L. Kasimu Harris for NPR hide caption

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L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Ending HIV In Mississippi Means Cutting Through Racism, Poverty And Homophobia

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Dr. Michelle Salvaggio, medical director of the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, points to drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS. Medical advancements since the epidemic surfaced in the 1980s have helped many of her HIV-positive patients lead healthy lives. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

White House Plan To Stop HIV Faces A Tough Road In Oklahoma

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Brittany Williams, a doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia, started taking Truvada when she began dating a man living with HIV. Even though the relationship ended, she continues to take it. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR