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Boeing 737 Max

Boeing 737 Max airplanes are stored in an area adjacent to Boeing Field last month in Seattle. Airlines around the world are cutting flights because of the grounding of the plane. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Boeing 737 Max Grounding Takes Toll On Airlines And Passengers

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Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, accompanied by other pilots and former FAA administrator Randy Babbitt, speaks during a House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing on the status of the Boeing 737 Max in Washington, D.C. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A Boeing employee works on the fuselage of a 737 Max 9 test plane at the company's factory in Renton, Wash., on March 14. Orders for durable goods jumped 2.7% last month, fueled in part by strong demand for commercial aircraft. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

For those who are scared of flying, an array of apps, websites and classes teach relaxation techniques and explain how airplanes work. Francisco Rama/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Francisco Rama/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

After Boeing Crashes, More People Want Help Taming Fear Of Flying

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Analysts say Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg and the company were slow to take responsibility in the crashes of two 737 Max planes within months of each other. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Boeing Slow To 'Own' Recent Air Disasters, Analysts Say

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An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 sits grounded in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in March. Ethiopian officials on Thursday released the initial report into last month's crash of a Max 8. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

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Mulugeta Ayene/AP

At a Senate hearing March 27, Daniel Elwell, acting director of the Federal Aviation Administration, said airline pilots had enough training to handle Boeing's flight control software. But some pilots disagree. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

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On the day of the Lion Air crash, Verian Utama (left) was traveling on the flight with a former pro rider named Andrea Manfredi (right), a friend who also perished. Courtesy of Verian Utama's family hide caption

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Courtesy of Verian Utama's family

For Family Of A Lion Air Crash Victim, 'The Happiness Is Gone'

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Federal Aviation Administration Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell (left), National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt, and Department of Transportation Inspector General Calvin Scovel, appear before a Senate Transportation subcommittee on commercial airline safety on Wednesday to discuss two recent Boeing 737 Max crashes. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

FAA Head Defends Agency Actions Following Recent Air Disasters

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