U.S. Census Bureau U.S. Census Bureau
Stories About

U.S. Census Bureau

Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

What is a 'household'?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1113487806/1114327644" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Juby George stands with his wife Shireen Bethala-George at the soft opening of Smell the Curry, a south Indian takeout and catering business at the Flourtown Farmers Market outside Philadelphia, on December 9, 2021. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Andrea Hsu/NPR

New businesses soared to record highs in 2021. Here's a taste of one of them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1072057249/1072133558" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As the nation begins its annual celebration of Latino history, culture and other achievements, it's not too late to ask why we lump together roughly 62 million people with complex identities under a single umbrella. Peter Pencil/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Pencil/Getty Images

A lesbian couple hold hands during the annual Gay Pride rally, on June 8, 2007. Recent survey data shows that LGBTQ adults in the U.S. are more likely to report higher rates of food and economic insecurity. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Silverman/Getty Images

A Census Bureau survey found that the number of households that said they were homeschooling doubled last year. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Census Bureau worker Jennifer Pope wears a face covering at a walk-up counting site in Greenville, Texas, on July 31. The bureau is ending all counting efforts for the 2020 census on Sept. 30, a month sooner than previously announced, the bureau's director confirmed Monday. LM Otero/AP hide caption

toggle caption
LM Otero/AP

Census Cuts All Counting Efforts Short By A Month

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/898548910/898871281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A housing development sits nestled in the South Mountain foothills in the Ahwatukee neighborhood in Phoenix. The city saw the biggest jump in population in the U.S. between 2017 and 2018. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ross D. Franklin/AP