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youth sports

Samuele Recchia for NPR

Kids can't all be star athletes. Here's how schools can welcome more students to play

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Fans watch as Buffalo Bills football player Damar Hamlin leaves Cincinnati's Paycor Stadium in an ambulance on Monday night after experiencing a cardiac arrest during a game. Kirk Irwin/Getty Images hide caption

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Kirk Irwin/Getty Images

Fifteen-year-olds from a DCXI soccer team practice together in Washington, D.C., in November. Club co-founder and coach Pierre Hedji says some of their team members pay and some don't. "If you can afford to pay the whole thing, pay the whole thing. That way we can afford to help the next kid that can't pay anything at all." Maansi Srivastava/NPR hide caption

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Maansi Srivastava/NPR

Club soccer puts the sport out of reach for many kids

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WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 4: Scenes from soccer practice on November 4, 2022, in Washington, DC. (Photo by Maansi Srivastava for The Washington Post) Maansi Srivastava/For NPR hide caption

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Maansi Srivastava/For NPR

What's being done to stop adults' misbehavior at youth soccer games

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A football lies on the turf prior to the NFL Week 1 game between the Atlanta Falcons and the Seattle Seahawks on September 13, 2020. David J. Griffin/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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David J. Griffin/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Opinion: Football Parents Could Learn From Their Kids' Activism

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Participation in team sports as a teen may help protect against the long-term mental health effects of childhood trauma. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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