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A worker at Munk Group in Günzburg, Germany, punches holes into a part that will be used to construct a ladder. After years of using Chinese suppliers, Munk Group recently decided to cut off all business with China. Germany's government has cautioned all German businesses to be careful about not depending too heavily on China, a strategy known as "de-risking." Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

German government wants companies to 'de-risk' from China, but business is reluctant

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Climate activists from the group Letzte Generation (Last Generation) hold up commuter traffic on a Monday morning in Berlin by supergluing themselves to the road. Police unstick their hands using cooking oil and a pastry brush while irate drivers look on, stuck for more than an hour. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR

A Steag coal power plant in Herne, Germany, on Aug. 25. The Essen-based energy company Steag wanted to convert the old coal-fired power plant Herne 4 into a gas-fired power plant at the beginning of the year. In March, Steag decided to postpone the conversion and to continue firing the old power plant with coal. Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

Amid an energy crisis, Germany turns to the world's dirtiest fossil fuel

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A boat is pictured on the shallow Rhine river near Oestrich Winkel, western Germany, on Aug. 12, as the water level passed below 40 centimeters, making ship transport increasingly difficult. Yann Schreiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yann Schreiber/AFP via Getty Images

Germany's Rhine is at one of its lowest levels. That's trouble for the top EU economy

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A child plays near communist-era apartment blocks in Hoyerswerda, Germany. After the collapse of the communist East German government that had redeveloped the area into an industrial hub, factories shut down and coal production declined. The population has sunk below 33,000 — about half its size before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In German Coal Country, This Former Socialist Model City Has Shrunk In Half

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