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far-right extremism

Kirsten Dunst (left) and Cailee Spaeny in Civil War. Murray Close/A24 hide caption

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Murray Close/A24

Is this fictitious civil war closer to reality than we think?

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Damage is seen at Brazil's Congress one day after supporters of former President Jair Bolsonaro stormed government buildings in Brasília. The attack was planned by far-right groups on social media, according to Brazilian media and analysts. Andressa Anholete/Getty Images hide caption

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Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

The attack on Brazil's Congress was stoked by social media — and by Trump allies

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A police officer observes participants in the demonstration of right-wing extremists and Reichsburger on March 20, 2021 in Berlin. German right-wing extremists and "Reich citizens" are growing in number and present a "high level of danger," according to German officials. Paul Zinken/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Zinken/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

How A Foiled Coup In Germany Came To Be

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A police officer observes participants in the demonstration of right-wing extremists and Reichsburger on March 20, 2021 in Berlin. German right-wing extremists and "Reich citizens" are growing in number and present a "high level of danger," according to German officials. Paul Zinken/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Zinken/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

German far-right groups becoming increasingly organized, says a historian

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A police officer holds one of a group of men, among 31 arrested for conspiracy to riot and affiliated with the white nationalist group Patriot Front, after they were found in the rear of a U-Haul van in the vicinity of a North Idaho Pride Alliance LGBTQ event in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, on June 11, 2022. John Rudoff/Reuters hide caption

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John Rudoff/Reuters

FBI agents document evidence outside a bureau field office in Kenwood, Ohio, on Aug. 11, after an armed man tried to breach the building. He fled and was later killed by law enforcement, authorities said. WKEF/WRGT via AP hide caption

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WKEF/WRGT via AP

Henry "Enrique" Tarrio, leader of the Proud Boys, holds a U.S. flag during a July protest in Miami as part of a show of solidarity for Cubans who were demonstrating against their government in Cuba. Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

After Arrests And Setbacks, Far-Right Proud Boys Press New Ambitions

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Pro-Trump rioters, including members of the far-right extremist group the Proud Boys, gather near the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. At least 25 people charged in the attack appear to have links to the Proud Boys, according to court documents. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Conspiracy Charges Bring Proud Boys' History Of Violence Into Spotlight

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Members of the Proud Boys march toward Freedom Plaza during a protest in December 2020 in Washington, D.C. The Proud Boys has been designated as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

A police officer guards the road in front of a house where police found the bodies of the suspected gunman and his mother, in Hanau, Germany, on Thursday. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

Shootings In Germany Kill 10; Police Suspect Far-Right Extremism

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ISIS attacks abroad and a series of deadly right-wing attacks in the U.S. have fueled a demand for more information on extremist networks. Understanding them is the first step in fighting them. But there has been little discussion about potential harm to the researchers tasked with looking deep inside the world's most dangerous movements. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'It Gets To You.' Extremism Researchers Confront The Unseen Toll Of Their Work

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An archived screenshot of 8chan, an online message board that shooters have used to post messages before their attacks, describes itself as "the darkest reaches of the Internet." Wayback Machine/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Wayback Machine/Screenshot by NPR

'Uniquely Lawless': Security Firm Drops 8chan Website Following El Paso Shooting

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Michael McGarrity, FBI Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division; Calvin Shivers, FBI Deputy Assistant Director in the Criminal Investigative Division; and Elizabeth Neumann, an assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security, answer lawmakers' questions on Tuesday about the Trump administration's response to far-right extremism. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP