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A Transportation Security Administration worker screens luggage at New York's LaGuardia Airport on Sept. 26, 2017. The TSA says it found a record number of firearms at airport security checkpoints last year. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Aaron Banks, 38, and his son Aaron Banks, Jr., 8, embrace at a local park on Saturday, May 22, 2021, in Cedar Park, Texas. "The image of the average gun enthusiast needs an update," the elder Banks said. Banks is president of Keep Firing LLC and one of 24 pistol instructors certified by the National African American Gun Association. Christian K. Lee hide caption

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Christian K. Lee

These are the faces of the rising number of Black gun owners in the U.S.

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A visitor holds a weapon during the Shot Fair Brasil, an arms exhibition held at the Expoville Conventions and Exhibitions Center in Joinville, Santa Catarina state, Brazil, on Aug. 5. Albari Sosa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Albari Sosa/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil's firearm ownership booms, and gun laws loosen, under President Bolsonaro

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Armed members of the Black Panther Party leave the Capitol in Sacramento May 2, 1967. The Panthers entered the Capitol fully armed and said they were protesting a bill before the Legislature restricting the carrying of arms in public. AP hide caption

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AP

Supporters of gun control measures gather at the Legislative Office Building in Concord, N.H., in August, to urge Republican Gov. Chris Sununu to act after mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. Michael Casey/AP hide caption

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Michael Casey/AP

Philip Smith is the president and founder of the National African American Gun Association. Since its creation in 2015, the group has seen rapid growth with roughly 30,000 members and 75 chapters nationwide. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

With A Growing Membership Since Trump, Black Gun Group Considers Getting Political

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