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NASA's new moon rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022. This launch is the first flight test of the Artemis program. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The Artemis 1 moon rocket at Launch Pad 39 at the Kennedy Space Center. Gregg Newton/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregg Newton/AFP via Getty Images

How Artemis 1 fits into NASA's grand vision for space exploration

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Astronaut Charlie M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity at the Descartes landing site. John W. Young/NASA hide caption

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John W. Young/NASA

NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft, standing atop the mobile launcher at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system prior to crewed flights to the Moon. NASA/Kim Shiflett hide caption

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NASA/Kim Shiflett

Artemis: NASA's New Chapter In Space

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The NASA Artemis 1 rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard moves slowly on an 11 hour journey to a launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Thursday, March 17, 2022. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Astronaut and geologist Harrison Schmitt is seen in the Lunar Roving Vehicle during NASA's Apollo 17 mission on Dec. 13, 1972. A lunar soil sample collected on the mission has remained sealed until now. Eugene A. Cernan - NASA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eugene A. Cernan - NASA/AFP via Getty Images

NASA's ambitions for putting astronauts on the moon have been delayed. Here, newly minted astronauts from NASA and the Canadian Space Agency are seen last year. They're the first candidates to graduate under the Artemis program, and could be eligible for assignments including the Artemis missions to the Moon, International Space Station, and missions to Mars. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

An image taken on the moon by a panoramic camera aboard the lander-ascender combination of of China's Chang'e-5 spacecraft, provided by China National Space Administration. China and Russia have announced plans to jointly construct a lunar research station. China National Space Administration/Xinhua/AP hide caption

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China National Space Administration/Xinhua/AP

This illustration made available by NASA in April 2020 depicts Artemis astronauts on the Moon. On Thursday, NASA announced the three companies that will develop, build and fly lunar landers, with the goal of returning astronauts to the moon by 2024. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP