yevgeny prigozhin yevgeny prigozhin
Stories About

yevgeny prigozhin

A portrait of the owner of private military company Wagner Group Yevgeny Prigozhin lays at an informal street memorial near the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Saturday, Aug. 26, 2023. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

A portrait of Yevgeny Prigozhin is seen among flowers at a makeshift memorial in front of the Wagner Group headquarters in St. Petersburg, Friday. Prigozhin and other members of the mercenary company are believed to have died in a plane crash in Russia. Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images

A view of the site after a jet crashed in Russia's northwestern Tver region on Aug. 23. Russian authorities say Wagner chief Yevgeny Prigozhin was among those on the flight manifest. Russian President Vladimir Putin expressed condolences to families of those killed in the crash. He noted Wagner members were reportedly on board and spoke warmly of his relationship with Prigozhin in the past tense. Wagner Telegram Account/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wagner Telegram Account/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

What we know — and don't — about the Russian crash that possibly killed Prigozhin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1195619718/1195634502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Yevgeny Prigozhin, the owner of the Wagner Group military company, looks from a military vehicle leaving an area of the HQ of the Southern Military District in a street in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, on June 24. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko says that Wagner chief Yevgeny Prigozhin is still in Russia. Lukashenko is seen here at his residence, the Independence Palace, in the capital Minsk on Thursday. Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images

Members of the Wagner Group sit atop of a tank in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, on Saturday. President Vladimir Putin said an armed mutiny by Wagner mercenaries was a "stab in the back" and that the group's chief, Yevgeny Prigozhin, had betrayed Russia. Prigozhin later called off his group's action and the Kremlin said he would go to Belarus. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

In this handout photo taken from video released by Prigozhin Press Service on Friday, March 3, 2023, Yevgeny Prigozhin, the owner of the Wagner Group military company, addresses Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy asking him to withdraw the remaining Ukrainian forces from Bakhmut to save their lives, at an unspecified location in Ukraine. Prigozhin Press Service via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Prigozhin Press Service via AP

Russian businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin attends a meeting with investors at the Eastern Economic Forum on Sept. 2, 2016, in Vladivostok, Russia. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Yevgeny Prigozhin, 'Putin's Chef,' has emerged from the shadows with his Wagner Group

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1160851615/1161079258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A poster displays a Russian soldier with a slogan reading "Glory to the Heroes of Russia." Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images

How a former caterer created the mercenary army fighting Putin's war in Ukraine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1158944377/1159071956" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russian businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin is shown prior to a meeting of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Prigozhin, an entrepreneur known as "Putin's chef" because of his catering contracts with the Kremlin, has admitted he interfered in U.S. elections and says he will continue to do so. Sergei Ilnitsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sergei Ilnitsky/AP

Facebook said the influence campaigns targeting people in eight African countries were connected to a Russian businessman tied to meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images