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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (center) walks with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., (left) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., on September 21. Zelenskyy made his renewed case for American aid to Ukraine to a deeply divided Congress. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba (center left) and European Union foreign policy chief Josep Borrell visit a monument to fallen defenders of Ukraine in Kyiv, Monday. Borrell and EU foreign ministers have gathered in Kyiv in a display of support for Ukraine's fight against Russia's invasion. Press service of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine via AP hide caption

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Press service of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine via AP

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy didn't mince words when he talked about the threat of Russia's war. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

As the U.S. mulls more aid to Ukraine, Zelenskyy says 'we have the same values'

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Members of the Wagner Group sit atop of a tank in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, on Saturday. President Vladimir Putin said an armed mutiny by Wagner mercenaries was a "stab in the back" and that the group's chief, Yevgeny Prigozhin, had betrayed Russia. Prigozhin later called off his group's action and the Kremlin said he would go to Belarus. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

China's leader Xi Jinping claps as he listens to Russian President Vladimir Putin via a video link, from the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Dec. 2, 2019. Xi will meet Putin this week on a visit to Moscow. Noel Celis/Pool photo via AP hide caption

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Noel Celis/Pool photo via AP

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (left) and British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak meet Ukrainian troops being trained to operate Challenger 2 tanks at a military facility in Lulworth, Dorset, England, on Wednesday. Andrew Matthews/Pool via AP hide caption

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Andrew Matthews/Pool via AP

Why Zelenskyy visited the U.K. nearly 1 year into Russia's war on Ukraine

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British Army Challenger 2 tanks are seen at a training ground in Poland on Sept. 21, 2022. This week, Ukrainian soldiers have arrived in the United Kingdom for training on the Challenger 2. Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images

U.S. Abrams tanks participate in a live fire demonstration during training exercises in Poland in September 2022. President Biden announced Wednesday that the U.S. will be sending 31 Abrams tanks to Ukraine. Germany also said it will be sending tanks. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Marques/Getty Images

Two Leopard 2 A6 heavy battle tanks and a Puma infantry fighting vehicle of the Bundeswehr's 9th Panzer Training Brigade participate in a demonstration of capabilities during a visit by then-Defense Minister Christine Lambrecht to the Bundeswehr Army training grounds in February 2022 in Munster, Germany. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

A woman holds a placard reading "Peace = Stop Putin" during a rally in support of Ukraine at Arco della Pace in Milan, Italy on Saturday. Piero Cruciatti/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Piero Cruciatti/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Italy has been a strong supporter of Ukraine — but that is starting to change

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A Ukrainian soldier stands atop an abandoned Russian tank near a village on the outskirts of Izium, in the Kharkiv region, eastern Ukraine. Ukraine said its swift offensive took significant ground back from Russia. Juan Barreto/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken talks with Marina, 6, from Ukraine's Kherson region, during his visit to a children's hospital in Kyiv on Thursday. Genya Savilov/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Genya Savilov/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

International Atomic Energy Agency chief Rafael Mariano Grossi talks to reporters on a road outside the city of Zaporizhzhia after his visit to the Russian-held Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in southern Ukraine on Sept. 1, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Genya Savilov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Genya Savilov/AFP via Getty Images

Black smoke rises at the front line in southern Ukraine's Mykolaiv Oblast on Aug. 30 amid Russia's military invasion of the country. Ukraine has begun a major counteroffensive to retake areas in the south that Russia seized early in the war. Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP via Getty Images

Ukraine's southern offensive relies on heavy weapons. Soldiers say there aren't enough

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A funeral procession in Lviv, Ukraine, in March ends at grave sites where soldiers Viktor Dudar, 44, and Ivan Koverznev, 24, will be buried, as priests say their blessings and mourners look on. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR