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Pensacola shooting

After an internal review of how foreign military students are screened, the U.S. Department of Defense says it will implement new security measures for prospective cadets. Josh Brasted/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Brasted/Getty Images

An Air Force team moves a transfer case containing the remains of one of the young sailors killed after a Saudi military student opened fire at Naval Air Station Pensacola last month. Officials are expected to soon announce that about 20 Saudi military students will be expelled from the U.S. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

U.S. Officials: More Than 20 Saudi Students To Be Expelled In Wake Of Fla. Shooting

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis says federal laws that allow foreign nationals to buy guns in the U.S. should be reviewed after a Saudi gunman carried out a mass shooting in Pensacola, Fla. DeSantis says, "The Second Amendment is so that we the American people can keep and bear arms. It does not apply to Saudi Arabians." Brendan Farrington/AP hide caption

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Brendan Farrington/AP

Three sailors were killed and eight injured in a shooting at the Pensacola Naval Air Station on Friday in Florida. The FBI is investigating the attack as an act of terrorism. Josh Brasted/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Brasted/Getty Images