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respiratory disease

Traffic on a hazy evening in Fresno, Calif. A new study estimates that about 50,000 lives could be saved each year if the U.S. eliminated small particles of pollution that are released from the tailpipes of cars and trucks, among other sources. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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Gary Kazanjian/AP

James Perkinson of Greenbrier, Tenn., underwent ECMO for nearly two months while he was sedated. He says without the "miracle" therapy, he "wouldn't be here right now." Kacie Perkinson hide caption

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Kacie Perkinson

Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Wildfires caused high levels of air pollution in San Francisco in November 2018. Climate change is making wildfires and heat waves more likely, and driving more days of unhealthy air in many U.S. cities. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

The mouthpiece of a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) device delivers enough pressurized air to keep the breathing passage of someone who has obstructive sleep apnea open throughout the night. Dr P. Marazzi/Science Source hide caption

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Dr P. Marazzi/Science Source

In 1918, the St. Louis Red Cross Motor Corps personnel wear masks as they hold stretchers next to ambulances in preparation for victims of the influenza epidemic. Library of Congress/AP hide caption

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Library of Congress/AP

An Unfinished Lesson

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There's "currently no scientific evidence establishing a link between ibuprofen and worsening of COVID‑19," the European Medicines Agency advised Wednesday. REKINC1980/Getty Images hide caption

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REKINC1980/Getty Images

Ventilators can be a temporary bridge to recovery — many patients in critical care who need them for help breathing get better. Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images hide caption

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Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images

As The Pandemic Spreads, Will There Be Enough Ventilators?

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Tom Cooper, Nashville General Hospital's supply chain director, inspects a box of N95 respirators. The hospital is among a small group of pilot sites now sharing data about the inventory of its protective equipment with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Blake Farmer/ WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/ WPLN

Early symptoms of COVID-19 are much the same as those of the flu or a cold. Don't panic. Call your doctor to check in, if you're worried, but treating mild or moderate symptoms at home until you're well will protect you and help stop the spread of whatever you have. Guido Mieth/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Mieth/Getty Images

You Have A Fever And A Dry Cough. Now What?

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A spoonful of honey makes the medicine...irrelevant. That's because honey works better than cough syrups to help with kids' coughs. But don't give honey to infants under one years old. Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rachen Buosa/Getty Images/EyeEm

For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey

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