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Wuhan coronavirus

Local residents protest the plans to quarantine evacuees from coronavirus-hit China at a local hospital, in the settlement of Novi Sanzhary, Ukraine, on Thursday. Maksym Mykhailyk/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Maksym Mykhailyk/AFP via Getty Images

Daniel Wethli got a warm welcome from his mom and dad at the Pittsburgh airport last week after clearing two weeks of quarantine in Southern California. He was studying in Wuhan when the novel coronavirus shut the city down, but never showed any signs of infection. Daniel Wethli hide caption

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Daniel Wethli

Evacuated For COVID-19 Scare, Pennsylvania Man Reflects On Life After Quarantine

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Australians Clare Hedger and her mother are now free from a two-week quarantine on the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Yokohama, Japan. Health officials in Japan are being sharply criticized for their handling of the coronavirus quarantine on the ship. Clare Hedger/via Reuters hide caption

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Clare Hedger/via Reuters

Research & Development associate Divya Nagalati works on cell cultures in Regeneron's infectious disease labs in Tarrytown, N.Y. The firm is looking for tailored antibodies that might prove useful against the new coronavirus. Rani Levy hide caption

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Rani Levy

Hunt For New Coronavirus Treatments Includes Gene-Silencing And Monoclonal Antibodies

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American evacuees from the Diamond Princess cruise ship arrive at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland on Monday in San Antonio, Texas. Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images hide caption

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Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images

Prominent Chinese rights advocate Xu Zhiyong speaks during a meeting in Beijing in a handout photo from 2013. Xu has been detained in southern China. Xiao Guozhen via Reuters hide caption

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Xiao Guozhen via Reuters

Rights Activist Xu Zhiyong Arrested In China Amid Crackdown On Dissent

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A doctor wearing a face mask looks at a CT image of a lung of a patient at a hospital in Wuhan, China. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

How COVID-19 Kills: The New Coronavirus Disease Can Take A Deadly Turn

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A passenger (right) is hugged by Cambodia Prime Minister Hun Sen after she disembarked from the MS Westerdam at the port of Sihanoukville, Cambodia, on Friday. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Heng Sinith/AP

A person walks through a shopping plaza in the Mong Kok neighborhood of Hong Kong. Fears of catching the virus have meant fewer people in public spaces. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A man wearing a face mask has his temperature checked before entering a community hospital in Shanghai on Thursday. China's official death toll and infection numbers from the deadly COVID-19 coronavirus spiked dramatically on Thursday after authorities changed their counting methods. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

A Change In How 1 Chinese Province Reports Coronavirus Adds Thousands Of Cases

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Many passengers aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship have created online groups to share news and encourage each other. And in some cases, they've formed lasting friendships. @daxa_tw/via Twitter hide caption

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@daxa_tw/via Twitter

Paul McKay, a molecular immunologist at the Imperial College School of Medicine in London, checks a dish of bacteria containing genetic material from the new coronavirus. He and his team are testing a candidate vaccine. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

"Our guests at March Air Reserve Base are happy to see an official end today to their 14-day quarantine," Riverside University Health System - Public Health said via Facebook Tuesday. The 195 Americans are now free to leave the base. Riverside University Health System - Public Health hide caption

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Riverside University Health System - Public Health

195 Americans Released From Coronavirus Quarantine At Southern California Air Base

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The quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship has 65 new cases of coronavirus, Japanese officials announced Monday. Here, passengers with ocean-facing rooms stand on their balconies as the ship sits at the Daikoku Pier Cruise Terminal in Yokohama, Japan. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

Workers disinfect closed shop lots following the coronavirus outbreak in Hubei, China, on Monday. Officials reported on Tuesday that the country's overall death toll had passed 1,000. Cheng Min/AP hide caption

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Cheng Min/AP

What Life Is Like For 3,700 Cruise Ship Passengers Stuck In Coronavirus Quarantine

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A horseshoe bat. Bats are known to carry many different strains of viruses but do not get sick from them. Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images

Bats Carry Many Viruses. So Why Don't They Get Sick?

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Flowers and a portrait of Dr. Li Wenliang is left at his hospital in Wuhan, China. Li, regarded a whistleblower in the coronavirus outbreak, died of the infectious disease on Friday. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Critics Say China Has Suppressed And Censored Information In Coronavirus Outbreak

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