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How COVID-19 Has Affected Medical Care For Non-Coronavirus Patients

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A man adjusts a boy's protective face mask on Thursday as they try to avoid contracting a new coronavirus in Seoul, South Korea. The country is reporting a spike in COVID-19 cases, predominantly in its south. Heo Ran/Reuters hide caption

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Heo Ran/Reuters

Workers in Pyongyang produce masks for protection against the new coronavirus. Experts say North Korea's track record of fighting epidemics does not bode well for its handling of the coronavirus outbreak. Kim Won-Jin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Won-Jin/AFP via Getty Images

North Korea Claims Zero Coronavirus Cases, But Experts Are Skeptical

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The Metropole Hotel in Hong Kong was ground zero for a super-spreading event during the 2003 SARS outbreak. K.Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images hide caption

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K.Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

What's A 'Super-Spreading Event'? And Has It Happened With COVID-19?

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Australians Clare Hedger and her mother are now free from a two-week quarantine on the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Yokohama, Japan. Health officials in Japan are being sharply criticized for their handling of the coronavirus quarantine on the ship. Clare Hedger/via Reuters hide caption

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Clare Hedger/via Reuters

An entrance to a dormitory for Foxconn workers. China's factories normally ramp up production right after the Lunar New Year, but few workers have returned so far this year. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

The Wide-Ranging Ways In Which The Coronavirus Is Hurting Global Business

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Checking for signs of COVID-19, a medical worker in a protective suit checks the temperatures of people who were on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship as they fly on a chartered evacuation plane from Japan to Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Philip and Gay Courter/via Reuters hide caption

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Philip and Gay Courter/via Reuters

American evacuees from the Diamond Princess cruise ship arrive at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland on Monday in San Antonio, Texas. Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images hide caption

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Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping attend a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Osaka last June. The two leaders spoke by phone earlier this month. Since the coronavirus outbreak, China has let in some experts from the World Health Organization but has not yet allowed in a team from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

For U.S. And China, Coronavirus Adds Pressure To Relationship Already Under Strain

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A bus departs from the dock where the Diamond Princess cruise ship sits under quarantine with its thousands of passengers and crew. Japanese authorities said Friday that some older passengers who tested negative for the coronavirus were allowed to disembark. Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP via Getty Images

A doctor wearing a face mask looks at a CT image of a lung of a patient at a hospital in Wuhan, China. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

How COVID-19 Kills: The New Coronavirus Disease Can Take A Deadly Turn

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The first U.S. case of COVID-19 was treated at Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, Washington. Robin Addison, a nurse there, demonstrates how she wears a respirator helmet with a face shield intended to prevent infection. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

A person walks through a shopping plaza in the Mong Kok neighborhood of Hong Kong. Fears of catching the virus have meant fewer people in public spaces. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A man wearing a face mask has his temperature checked before entering a community hospital in Shanghai on Thursday. China's official death toll and infection numbers from the deadly COVID-19 coronavirus spiked dramatically on Thursday after authorities changed their counting methods. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

A Change In How 1 Chinese Province Reports Coronavirus Adds Thousands Of Cases

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The city of Wuhan, epicenter of the current coronavirus outbreak. Jia Yu/Getty Images hide caption

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Jia Yu/Getty Images

Can Coronavirus Be Crushed By Warmer Weather?

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Many passengers aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship have created online groups to share news and encourage each other. And in some cases, they've formed lasting friendships. @daxa_tw/via Twitter hide caption

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@daxa_tw/via Twitter