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The ROSA machine allows surgeons to zero in on areas of the brain tied to seizures, and guides a surgical arm precisely to the target. University of California, San Diego hide caption

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University of California, San Diego
LUVLIMAGE/Getty Images

Time is so much weirder than it seems

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Illustration of DART, from behind the NEXT–C ion engine NASA/Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Busting 5 common myths about water and hydration

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Kenyan mountaineer James Kagambi (C), 62, is welcomed upon his arrival as the first Kenyan who reached the summit of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak of 8,849 meters, at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, on May 23, 2022. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

James Kagambi: The 62 Year Old Who Just Summited Everest

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U.S. President George Bush jokes with French marine biologist Jacques Cousteau, center, and Jo Elizabeth Butler, the legal adviser of the Climate Change Secretariat, in Rio de Janeiro after signing the United Nations Convention on Climate Change, June 12, 1992. The draft was hammered out the month before in New York. Dennis Cook / AP hide caption

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Dennis Cook / AP

A Climate Time Capsule, Part 2: The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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To try to break less-than-ideal habits one may have developed over the pandemic, it's ok to start slowly. SolStock/Getty Images hide caption

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SolStock/Getty Images

An Eastern Gray Squirrel eats some seeds and nuts from a bird feeder. Travis Lindquist/Getty Images hide caption

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Travis Lindquist/Getty Images

Who Runs The World? Squirrels!

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The average American eats more than 22 pounds of ice cream an frozen treats a year. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

The Joy Of Ice Cream's Texture

July is National Ice Cream Month — and Sunday, July 18 is National Ice Cream Day (in the US)! Flavors range from the classics — vanilla and chocolate — to the adventurous — jalapeño and cicada. But for some people, including ice cream scientist Dr. Maya Warren, flavor is only one part of the ice cream allure. So in today's episode, Emily Kwong talks with Short Wave producer Thomas Lu about some of the processes that create the texture of ice cream, and how that texture plays into our enjoyment of the tasty treat.

The Joy Of Ice Cream's Texture

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Sea cucumbers have one of the more interesting — and multifunctional — anuses in the animal kingdom. Comstock Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Comstock Images/Getty Images

Behold! The Anus: An Evolutionary Marvel

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There are over 7,000 known languages spoken by people around the world. Olga Klimentyeva / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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Olga Klimentyeva / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium

'I'm Willing To Fight For It': Learning A Second Language As An Adult

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MIT's Martin Zwierlein works with ultracold atomic gases. Within these glowing clouds of atoms, "superfluid" states of matter form. Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group hide caption

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Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group

This taken in Oct. 2020 and provided by Pfizer shows part of a "freezer farm," a football field-sized facility for storing finished COVID-19 vaccines, in Puurs, Belgium. AP hide caption

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AP

The COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Results: What They Mean, What Comes Next

Interim results are in from a large trial of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine. Drug maker Pfizer, working with German company BioNTech, says its vaccine appears to be working really well — it was found to be more than 90 percent effective. Today on Short Wave, host Maddie Sofia talks to NPR science correspondent Joe Palca about what that efficacy number means, details of the study and what more information about the vaccine researchers are awaiting.

The COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Results: What They Mean, What Comes Next

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