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gene-editing

He Jiankui announced nearly five years ago that he had created the first gene-edited babies. Aowen Cao/NPR hide caption

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Aowen Cao/NPR

His baby gene editing shocked ethicists. Now he's in the lab again

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In London to address a gene-editing summit last week, Victoria Gray took a break to visit Sir John Soane's Museum. In 2019, Gray became the first patient to be treated for sickle cell disease using CRISPR, an experimental gene-editing technique. She was invited to talk about her experiences at the Third International Summit on Human Genome Editing. Orlando Gili for NPR hide caption

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Orlando Gili for NPR

Sickle cell patient's success with gene editing raises hopes and questions

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Researchers meeting in London this week concluded that techniques that have made it easier to manipulate DNA still produce too many mistakes for scientists to be confident any children born from edited embryos (such as these, photographed in 2018) would be healthy. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Ethical concerns temper optimism about gene-editing for human diseases

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Biophysicist He Jiankui addressed the last international summit on human genome editing in Hong Kong in 2018. His experiments in altering the genetic makeup of human embryos was widely condemned by scientists and ethicists at the time, and still casts a long shadow over this week's summit in London. Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Experts weigh medical advances in gene-editing with ethical dilemmas

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Carlene Knight, who has a congenital eye disorder, volunteered to let doctors edit the genes in her retina using CRISPR. Franny White/OHSU hide caption

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Franny White/OHSU

A Gene-Editing Experiment Let These Patients With Vision Loss See Color Again

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Victoria Gray (second from left) with children Jamarius Wash, Jadasia Wash and Jaden Wash. Now that the gene-editing treatment has eased Gray's pain, she has been able be more active in her kids' lives and looks forward to the future. "This is really a life-changer for me," she says. Victoria Gray hide caption

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Victoria Gray

1st Patients To Get CRISPR Gene-Editing Treatment Continue To Thrive

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Scientists at the Casey Eye Institute, in Portland, Ore., have have injected a harmless virus containing CRISPR gene-editing instructions inside the retinal cells of a patient with a rare form of genetic blindness. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

In A 1st, Scientists Use Revolutionary Gene-Editing Tool To Edit Inside A Patient

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Scientist He Jiankui was criticized by colleagues after his claim to have created gene-edited babies became public. Three leading scientific organizations are calling for more controls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images