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coronavirus antibody testing

People line up in mid-April in Chelsea, Mass., to get antibody tests for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Stan Grossfeld/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Grossfeld/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Antibody Tests Point To Lower Death Rate For The Coronavirus Than First Thought

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Blood collection tubes sit in a rack on the first day of a free COVID-19 antibody testing event at the Volusia County Fairgrounds in DeLand, Fla., on May 4. Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Getting An Antibody Test For The Coronavirus? Here's What It Won't Tell You

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Anthony Reyes, a police officer with the City of Miami, shows the results of his coronavirus antibody test at the Hard Rock Stadium testing site in Miami Gardens, Fla., in early May. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A Double-Barreled Approach To Antibody Testing Could Improve Accuracy

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An illustration shows spiky antigens studding the virus's outer coat. Tests under development that look for these antigens might be faster than PCR tests for diagnosing COVID-19, proponents say. But the tests might still need PCR-test confirmation. Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A Next-Generation Coronavirus Test Raises Hopes And Concerns

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A project in San Francisco to estimate spread of the coronavirus in hard-hit neighborhoods has expanded testing to everyone over age 4 in a broad swath of the Mission District this week, including at a pop-up site at Garfield Square. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

San Francisco Enlists A Key Latino Neighborhood In Coronavirus Testing

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A health worker takes a swab test at a COVID-19 testing center in New Delhi on Monday. India's main medical research organization has canceled orders to procure rapid antibody test kits from two Chinese companies. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

Coronavirus antibody test kits are key to plans for proposed "immunity passports," but the World Health Organization is warning that such cards may simply encourage further transmission. Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the spherical particles of the new coronavirus, colorized blue. New York is planning a major effort to test the population for antibodies for the coronavirus as a key to deciding whether to reopen the economy. Hannah A. Bullock, Azaibi Tamin/AP hide caption

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Hannah A. Bullock, Azaibi Tamin/AP