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test, trace and isolate

As some campuses welcome students back, administrators are weighing their options to keep the community safe. Some are betting on frequent, regular testing. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

14 States Make Contact Tracing Data Public. Here's What They're Learning

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Care resource coordinator Luisa Schaeffer scrolls through her COVID-19 isolation case list for the day: One woman is out of milk, while another needs help finding a doctor and making an appointment. A man also asks about getting help to pay rent. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR
Ruth Talbot/NPR

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging. The Contact Tracing Workforce Is Not

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Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services, adjusts his face mask while testifying this month before a House subcommittee on the coronavirus crisis. Kevin Lamarque/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Pool/Getty Images

Despite Shortfalls And Delays, U.S. Testing Czar Says Efforts Are Mostly 'Sufficient'

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Contact tracing for the coronavirus is the subject of colorful conspiracy theories. In fact, contact tracing is a straightforward process of notifying people if they've been exposed to someone who is sick. Hannah Norman/KHN hide caption

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Hannah Norman/KHN
NPR

As Coronavirus Surges, How Much Testing Does Your State Need To Subdue The Virus?

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People leave a train at the central station in Frankfurt, Germany, on Thursday. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

How Germany Staffed Up Contact Tracing Teams To Contain Its Coronavirus Outbreak

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

As States Reopen, Do They Have The Workforce They Need To Stop Coronavirus Outbreaks?

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Stephanie Adeline

States Nearly Doubled Plans For Contact Tracers Since NPR Surveyed Them 10 Days Ago

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

U.S. Coronavirus Testing Still Falls Short. How's Your State Doing?

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South Carolina has permitted retail stores to reopen to customers. It's one of a handful of states easing up on some social distancing restrictions. Dustin Chambers/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dustin Chambers/Bloomberg via Getty Images