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An NPR analysis of data released Jan. 8 by the Small Business Administration shows the vast majority of Paycheck Protection Program loans have been forgiven, despite rampant fraud in the program. Getty Images/Mark Harris for NPR hide caption

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Getty Images/Mark Harris for NPR

How the Paycheck Protection Program went from good intentions to a huge free-for-all

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A closed sign is displayed in the window of a business in a nearly deserted lower Manhattan on April 17, 2020, in New York. Many small businesses benefited from a government emergency loan program during the pandemic, but its effectiveness is still in doubt. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Did Emergency PPP Loans Work? Nearly $800 Billion Later, We Still Don't Know

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A store in Boston displays a sign noting its Black ownership on June 24, 2020. Black-owned businesses struggled to get coronavirus emergency loans last year, until community lenders stepped in to help. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Small Local Banks Make A Big Difference For Black-Owned Businesses Trying To Hang On

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The Justice Department has accused 57 people of defrauding the Paycheck Protection Program. A portion of the program's application is shown here. Wayne Partlow/AP hide caption

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Wayne Partlow/AP

Cory Obenour, chef and co-owner of the Blue Plate restaurant in San Francisco, prepares takeout and delivery orders. The restaurant received funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, according to The Associated Press. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Rosemary Ugboajah (at front) with her company's leadership team, Alan Tse and Sheri Ellis. Terry Hastings/The Hastings Gallery hide caption

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Terry Hastings/The Hastings Gallery

Minority-Owned Small Businesses Were Supposed To Get Priority. They May Not Have

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A closed sign is posted at a restaurant along the River Walk in San Antonio on April 28. Banks are reporting a little more success in getting small business owners' applications for coronavirus relief loans into government processing systems. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Signs are displayed in the window of a store in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. The Paycheck Protection Program, aimed at helping small businesses survive the coronavirus crisis, has been beset by problems. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Christian Piatt, co-owner of the Brew Drinkery in Granbury, Texas, was forced to close his brewery's doors due to the coronavirus less than two months after he opened. Christian Piatt hide caption

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Christian Piatt

Small Businesses Say Rescue Loans Come With Too Many Strings Attached

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The Los Angeles Lakers and a handful of businesses are returning money they received from a federal program that was intended to help small companies hurt by the coronavirus pandemic. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Rev. James Perkins of Greater Christ Baptist Church is one of several black pastors in Detroit who were unsuccessful in their SBA loan applications. Courtesy James Perkins hide caption

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Courtesy James Perkins

Black Pastors Say They Have Trouble Accessing SBA Loan Program

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