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coronavirus vaccine trials

According to a review published in 2018, nearly 75% of the drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the 21st century had no data associated with their use during pregnancy. Orbon Alija/Getty Images hide caption

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Orbon Alija/Getty Images

This taken in Oct. 2020 and provided by Pfizer shows part of a "freezer farm," a football field-sized facility for storing finished COVID-19 vaccines, in Puurs, Belgium. AP hide caption

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The COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Results: What They Mean, What Comes Next

Interim results are in from a large trial of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine. Drug maker Pfizer, working with German company BioNTech, says its vaccine appears to be working really well — it was found to be more than 90 percent effective. Today on Short Wave, host Maddie Sofia talks to NPR science correspondent Joe Palca about what that efficacy number means, details of the study and what more information about the vaccine researchers are awaiting.

The COVID-19 Vaccine Trial Results: What They Mean, What Comes Next

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Albert Bourla, chairman and CEO of Pfizer, sold millions of dollars' worth of company stock on Monday as part of a preset plan. But NPR found irregularities about when the CEO entered into that plan. Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pfizer CEO Sold Millions In Stock After Coronavirus Vaccine News, Raising Questions

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The study is still awaiting final regulatory approval. If given the green light, a study in which human volunteers will be infected with the coronavirus will begin in January at a biosecure unit at London's Royal Free Hospital. Kirsty O'Connor/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirsty O'Connor/PA Images via Getty Images
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As COVID-19 Vaccine Trials Move At Warp Speed, Recruiting Black Volunteers Takes Time

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