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COVID-19 testing

A person swabs their nose as they receive testing for both rapid antigen and PCR COVID-19 tests at a Reliant Health Services testing site in Hawthorne, Calif., on Jan. 18. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Even if they can find a test, not everyone wants to know they have COVID

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At-home rapid COVID-19 tests, like this one from Abbott, can be difficult to find and cost-prohibitive for some families. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Why rapid COVID tests are in short supply in the U.S.

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A student gives her coronavirus swab to Helenann Civian, the principal of South Boston Catholic Academy in Boston in January. The White House announced $10 billion to expand testing in K-12 schools. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Is The Biden Administration Doing Enough To Boost COVID-19 Testing?

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In an aerial view from a drone, cars line up at Dodger Stadium for COVID-19 testing in Los Angeles, California. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

A Rush On Coronavirus Testing Strains Laboratories, Drives Supply Shortages

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A man is tested for the coronavirus on Sunday in Košice, Slovakia, as part of a nationwide effort to test nearly everyone over age 10 for the virus. Zuzana Gogova/Getty Images hide caption

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Zuzana Gogova/Getty Images

Regular coronavirus testing can be a valuable tool in preventing the spread of infection but only if accompanied with other critical health measures, experts say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images