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Alzheimer's research

A precisely timed pulse to a brain area just behind the ear can help reduce memory deficits in patients suffering moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries. Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

When a brain injury impairs memory, a pulse of electricity may help

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The Food and Drug Administration has fully approved Leqembi, the first drug shown to slow down Alzheimer's disease. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Alzheimer's drug Leqembi gets full FDA approval. Medicare coverage will likely follow

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In patients with Alzheimer's disease, a substance called beta-amyloid can form toxic clumps in between neurons. Drugs like lecanemab are designed to remove amyloid-beta from the brain. National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health. hide caption

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National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health.

An Alzheimer's drug is on the way, but getting it may still be tough. Here's why

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A new study finds that stimulating the brain during sleep can improve memory. DrAfter123/Getty Images hide caption

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DrAfter123/Getty Images

Scientists zap sleeping humans' brains with electricity to improve their memory

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U.S. health officials approved Leqembi, a new Alzheimer's drug that modestly slows the brain disease. The FDA granted accelerated approval Friday for patients in early stages of Alzheimer's. David Duprey/AP hide caption

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David Duprey/AP

FDA approves Alzheimer's drug that appears to modestly slow disease

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This illustration made available by the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health depicts cells in an Alzheimer's-affected brain. An experimental drug modestly slowed the brain disease's progression, researchers reported Tuesday. NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP hide caption

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP

A doctor points to PET scan results that are part of Alzheimer's disease research. Much work in the field focuses a substance called beta-amyloid. A new study could test whether that's the right target. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What causes Alzheimer's? Study puts leading theory to 'ultimate test'

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Karen Douthitt (left) found she does not carry the rare genetic mutation for early-onset Alzheimer's dementia, but her older sister June Ward (right) does carry it. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

Three Sisters And The Fight Against Alzheimer's Disease

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tim and tim/Getty Images

This form of memory loss is common — but most Americans don't know about it

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Microglia, specialized cells like the one seen in the center of this image, can restrain the accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (plaques in orange) that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. But the cells sometimes contribute to the progression of the illness, researchers say. Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source

Scan Of The Brain Of A Patient Affected By Alzheimer's Disease Axial Section. The Food and Drug Administration approved aducanamab, the first drug to affect the underlying disease processes associated with Alzheimer's in June. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty

Why Aduhelm, a new Alzheimer's treatment, isn't reaching many patients

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Researchers are learning that there is a significant relationship between sleep and dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. Basak Gurbuz Derman/Getty Images hide caption

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Basak Gurbuz Derman/Getty Images

Deep Sleep Protects Against Alzheimer's, Growing Evidence Shows

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Recruiting patients for medical studies has been challenging during the pandemic, especially older people who are more vulnerable to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Big Alzheimer's Drug Study Is Proceeding Cautiously Despite The Pandemic

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