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COVID-19 treatment

A box of Evusheld, an antibody therapy developed by pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca for the prevention of COVID-19 in immunocompromised patients, is seen in February at the AstraZeneca facility for biological medicines in Sweden Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images

A COVID-19 antiviral pill called molnupiravir from Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics is being considered by the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use in the coronavirus pandemic. Merck & Co Inc./Handout via Reuters hide caption

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Merck & Co Inc./Handout via Reuters

Jennifer Minhas had been a nurse for years when she contracted COVID-19 in 2020. Since then, lingering symptoms — what's known as long-haul COVID-19 — made it impossible for her to work. For months, she and her doctors struggled to understand what was behind her fatigue and rapid heartbeat, among other symptoms. Tara Pixley for NPR hide caption

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Tara Pixley for NPR

In an update on COVID-19 Wednesday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer discussed the state's efforts to expand the use of monoclonal antibody therapy to help those diagnosed with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. Michigan Office of the Governor/AP hide caption

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Michigan Office of the Governor/AP

Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Are A Cumbersome Tool Against Surges

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A nurse tends to a Covid-19 patient in the intensive care unit at Providence St. Mary Medical Center in Apple Valley, Calif., on Jan. 11. Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images

After A Year Battling COVID-19, Drug Treatments Get A Mixed Report Card

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Nurse Salina Padilla prepares an infusion of a COVID-19 antibody treatment at Desert Valley Hospital in Victorville, Calif., in December. Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Tracking Down Antibody Treatment Is A Challenge For COVID-19 Patients

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President Trump boards Marine One for a trip from the White House to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for COVID-19 treatment in early October. Trump received Regeneron's antibody cocktail during his illness. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Low Demand For Antibody Drugs Against COVID-19

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COVID-19 mortality rates are going down, according to studies of two large hospital systems, partly thanks to improvements in treatment. Here, clinicians care for a patient in July at an El Centro, Calif., hospital. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Studies Point To Big Drop In COVID-19 Death Rates

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