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Robinhood

People wait in line for T-shirts at a pop-up kiosk for the online brokerage Robinhood in New York City after the company went public on July 29, 2021. On Tuesday, the company said it was cutting nearly a quarter of its staff. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

People are reflected in the window of the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The price of free stock trading

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U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gary Gensler testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on Sept. 14 in Washington, D.C. Gensler discussed his approach to the job in a recent interview with NPR. Bill Clark/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/Pool/Getty Images

Why Wall Street's top cop thinks it's time to get tough

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In this image from video provided by the House Financial Services Committee, Vlad Tenev, chief executive officer of Robinhood, testifies during a virtual hearing on GameStop in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 18. Robinhood is facing a range of lawsuits and potential regulary action as it gears up to make its Wall Street debut. Provided by House Financial Services Committee/AP hide caption

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Provided by House Financial Services Committee/AP

The Robinhood IPO Is Here. But There Are Doubts About Its Future

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The Robinhood investment app appears on a smartphone in this photo illustration. Day trading has surged during the coronavirus pandemic as stay-at-home people try buying and selling stocks, often for the first time. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

He Thought Day Trading Would Be A Thrill. He Ended Up Losing $127,000

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