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Maryland National Guard Spc. James Truong administers a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine on May 21 in Wheaton, Maryland. People vaccinated with the Moderna vaccine likely need a booster to keep up their protection against the new omicron variant of the coronavirus. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Omicron evades Moderna vaccine too, study suggests, but boosters help

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Ari Blank got a comforting hand-squeeze from his mom in May as he was vaccinated against COVID-19 in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. This week, the Food and Drug Administration authorized the use of Pfizer's vaccine in even younger kids — ages 5 to 11. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

A nurse draw a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine dose from a vial at the Cameron Grove Community Center in Bowie, Md., in late March. Moderna says study data supports use of a half-dose of the vaccine in children 6 to 11. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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The CDC's new research found that those who were vaccinated were nearly five times less likely to get infected, 10 times less likely to get so sick they ended up in the hospital and 11 times less likely to die. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

A third shot of the Moderna vaccine boosts protection across age groups, notably in older adults, the company says. Juana Miyer/Long Visual Press/Universal Imag hide caption

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Juana Miyer/Long Visual Press/Universal Imag

This June 14, 2021, file photo shows a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine vial that is being administered for flight attendants of Japan Airlines at Haneda Airport in Tokyo. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Scientists have studied the blood of people who were part of a large trial for the Moderna vaccine to measures antibodies that can help predict levels of immunity after getting a COVID-19 shot. Britta Pedersen/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Britta Pedersen/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

New Evidence Points To Antibodies As A Reliable Indicator Of Vaccine Protection

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Federal health officials are planning ahead to give booster shots in the fall to all U.S. adults, starting with those who were vaccinated early on, like the elderly, health care workers and first responders. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Only kids 12 and older are eligible — so far — to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in the U.S. But the shots could be available for younger children as soon as this fall, say researchers studying the vaccine in that age group. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

The CDC recommended that people with weakened immune systems get a third shot of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine. The move follows the FDA's authorization of such use a day earlier. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

A teen gets a dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine last month at Holtz Children's Hospital in Miami. Nearly 7 million U.S. teens and preteens (ages 12 through 17) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine so far, the CDC says. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A vial of the experimental Novavax coronavirus vaccine is ready for use in a London study in 2020. Novavax's vaccine candidate contains a noninfectious bit of the virus — the spike protein — with a substance called an adjuvant added that helps the body generate a strong immune response. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

A New Type Of COVID-19 Vaccine Could Debut Soon

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Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization is recommending allowing people to mix COVID-19 vaccine doses. Here, people walk past a vaccination clinic this week in Toronto. Zou Zheng/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Zou Zheng/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

A medical worker at South Shore University Hospital gets ready to administer the newly available Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in Bay Shore, N.Y., Wednesday. Clinical research found it to be 85% effective in preventing severe disease four weeks after vaccination, and it has demonstrated promising indications of protection against a couple of concerning variants of the coronavirus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Got Questions About Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 Vaccine? We Have Answers

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Dolly Parton, pictured performing in May 2014, shared a video of herself getting her first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine on Tuesday. Wade Payne/Invision/via AP hide caption

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Wade Payne/Invision/via AP

Nurse Keith Grant got his second dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine on schedule from registered nurse Valerie Massaro in January at the Hartford Convention Center — 21 days after his first immunization. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Vaccine: Don't Miss 2nd Dose Because Of Scheduling Glitches

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During remarks at the National Institutes of Health, President Joe Biden said his administration has secured enough Covid-19 vaccines to ensure the nation is on track to vaccinate 300 million Americans by mid-July. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP