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Noelia Voigt (L) and UmaSofia Srivastava (R) attend a charity event in New York City on May 8, the week that they stepped down as Miss USA and Miss Teen USA. Rob Kim/Getty Images for Smile Train hide caption

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Rob Kim/Getty Images for Smile Train

Miss Teen USA, UmaSofia Srivastava, left, and Miss USA, Noelia Voigt pictured at a New York Fashion Week event in February. They both announced their resignations this week. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Supermodels Unlimited hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Supermodels Unlimited

People walk on the Stanford University campus beneath Hoover Tower in Stanford, Calif., on March 14, 2019. Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne said on Wednesday he would resign, citing an independent review that cleared him of research misconduct but found flaws in other papers authored by his lab. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Pope Francis looks at the Christmas tree inside the Paul VI hall as he arrives to meet with faithful during an audience granted to the donors of the Christmas tree and Nativity scene at the Vatican, on Dec. 3, 2022. Pope Francis has revealed in an interview that shortly after being elected pontiff in 2013 he wrote a resignation letter in case medical problems impede him from carrying out duties. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

FILE - Argentina's Economy Minister Martin Guzman walks outside of the International Monetary Fund, IMF, building during the IMF Spring Meetings, in Washington, April 21, 2022. Guzman announced his resignation on Saturday, July 2, via twitter. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

A Sri Lankan government supporter carries a national flag after attacking the anti-government demonstrators outside the president's office in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on Monday. Eranga Jayawardena/AP hide caption

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Eranga Jayawardena/AP

The Massachusetts State Police headquarters in Framingham, Mass. The State Police Association of Massachusetts said troopers should have "reasonable alternatives" to being required to get vaccinated for COVID-19 such as wearing masks and being tested regularly. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

A "Help Wanted" sign posted in Brooklyn New York. Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe brings on CBS MoneyWatch editor Irina Ivanova to break down some of the reasons why. Then, The New Republic staff writer Jo Livingstone joins Ayesha to discuss the current state of horror movies and why nothing's better than a good scare. Author and Big Mood, Little Mood podcast host Daniel Lavery joins them to play Who Said That.

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

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