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During spawning corals release their eggs and sperm, filling the water like confetti, which combine to create the next generation of reef builders. Marie Roman/AIMS hide caption

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Marie Roman/AIMS

Scientists are breeding 'super corals.' Can they withstand climate change?

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A man walks over his collapsed mud house after heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan in 2022. Climate change makes heavy rain more common, because a hotter atmosphere can hold more moisture. Fida Hussain/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fida Hussain/AFP via Getty Images
Denis Riek

About 6,500 mammal species live on Earth today. Credit from left to right: John Moore/Getty Images; Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP via Getty Images; Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images; Paula Bronstein/Getty Images Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Welcome to the mammalverse: Scientists sequence DNA from 240 species around the world

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A piece of plastic debris that's been colonized by both costal barnacles (pink and striped) and a gooseneck barnacle from the open ocean. Linsey Haram/SERC Marine Invasions Lab hide caption

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Linsey Haram/SERC Marine Invasions Lab

This floating ocean garbage is home to a surprising amount of life from the coasts

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A female cockroach considers accepting a sugary offering from a male cockroach. Ayako Wada-Katsumata hide caption

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Ayako Wada-Katsumata

These cockroaches tweaked their mating rituals after adapting to pest control

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A new study finds that common climate change terms can be confusing to the public. That includes phrases that describe the transition from fossil fuels to cleaner sources of energy. Here, wind turbines operate near a coal-fired power plant in Germany. Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

Sweating has allowed humans to survive, and thrive. Europa Press News/Europa Press via Getty Images hide caption

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Europa Press News/Europa Press via Getty Images

Sweat: A Human Superpower

Sweating is critical to helping humans avoid overheating, and it's different than how most animals cool down. Sarah Everts wanted to understand more about how humans came to sweat like we do, and wrote a book called The Joy of Sweat - which she talked about with Rhitu for this episode.

Sweat: A Human Superpower

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A thin strip of sand is all that stands between multimillion-dollar homes on the Southern California coast and a rising Pacific Ocean. A state bill aims to buy, then rent out such properties until they're no longer habitable. Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images

California Has A New Idea For Homes At Risk From Rising Seas: Buy, Rent, Retreat

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