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Finding affordable housing for both renters and buyers is feeling impossible lately. Experts point to a shortage of an estimated four to seven million homes. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Housing experts say there just aren't enough homes in the U.S.

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/National Public Radio

The promise and peril of mobile home ownership

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Mike Noel at the Heritage Plantation community, June 8, 2022. Noel retired and bought a home in the mobile home park and looked forward to fishing in the ocean 20 minutes away. "I thought I was moving to paradise," he says. Eva Marie Uzcategui for NPR hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui for NPR

From floods to slime: Mobile home residents say landlords make millions, neglect them

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Mehran Mossaddad is a single dad who drives Uber for a living. But when the pandemic hit, he stopped because he couldn't leave his daughter home alone. He fell behind on rent and is facing eviction. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Millions Could Face Eviction With Federal Moratorium Ending And A Logjam In Aid

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Barbara Gaught stands outside the home she's now renting in Billings, Mont., with her 5-year-old son, Blazen, and their dog, Arie. Gaught and her family were evicted from the mobile home they had owned outright and lived in for 16 years because they fell behind on 'lot rent' for the little plot of land under the mobile home. Louise Johns for NPR hide caption

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Louise Johns for NPR

Losing It All: Mobile Home Owners Evicted Over Small Debts During Pandemic

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The Texas Supreme Court has allowed an emergency order to expire. Housing groups warn that this could result in thousands of people losing their homes to eviction. Tenants' rights advocates, like those pictured here in Boston, have pushed for stronger protections for renters during the pandemic. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Texas Courts Open Eviction Floodgates: 'We Just Stepped Off A Cliff'

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Gregory Curry has had almost all his belongings in boxes and in a storage locker since he was evicted in August. He spent more than seven months struggling to survive financially and unable to find another landlord willing to rent to him. Colin Hackley for NPR hide caption

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Colin Hackley for NPR

Evicted And Homeless Due To Pandemic — 'I Literally Had To Sleep In My Car'

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