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CDC eviction ban

Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

A man walks through a neighborhood of single-family homes in Los Angeles last week. The CDC announced a new temporary eviction ban a few days after the previous one expired. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Here's What You Need To Know About The New Eviction Ban

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Mehran Mossaddad is a single dad who drives Uber for a living. But when the pandemic hit, he stopped because he couldn't leave his daughter home alone. He fell behind on rent and is facing eviction. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Millions Could Face Eviction With Federal Moratorium Ending And A Logjam In Aid

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Katrina Chism's landlord filed an eviction case against her after she lost her job during the coronavirus pandemic and fell a month behind on the rent. "Once you get that eviction, no one's going to want you to rent from them," Chism, 41, says. Katrina Chism hide caption

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Katrina Chism

Corporate Landlord Evicts Black Renters At Far Higher Rates Than Whites, Report Finds

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The Texas Supreme Court has allowed an emergency order to expire. Housing groups warn that this could result in thousands of people losing their homes to eviction. Tenants' rights advocates, like those pictured here in Boston, have pushed for stronger protections for renters during the pandemic. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Texas Courts Open Eviction Floodgates: 'We Just Stepped Off A Cliff'

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