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vaccine side effects

Licensed practical nurse Yokasta Castro, of Warwick, R.I., draws a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe. The vaccines have now been linked to minor changes in menstruation, but are still considered safe. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

COVID vaccines may briefly change your menstrual cycle, but you should still get one

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It's not a known side effect, but some people are experiencing changes to their menstrual cycles after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Reports have led some researchers to take a closer look at the possible connection. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Anti-Vaccine Activists Use A Federal Database To Spread Fear About COVID Vaccines

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The usual side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine can range from a sore arm to flu-like symptoms. Or, if you're lucky, you won't get any side effects at all. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR