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supply chain bottlenecks

JENS SCHLUETER/AFP via Getty Images

The semiconductor shortage (still)

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Protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine after Britain imposed a biting package of sanctions on Russia. JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images

Russia's sanctions, graded

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A person walks in an Ikea warehouse in New York City on Oct. 15. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Warehouses are overwhelmed by America's shopping spree

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An inflatable snowman and candy canes are part of the decorations that adorn houses in Brooklyn's Dyker Heights neighborhood on Dec. 22, 2020 in New York. A shopping surge by households this year has snarled up global supply chains, and now the race is on to get products on shelves in time for Christmas. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

The race is on to save Christmas as retailers fight the supply chain crunch

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Smoke from the Bond Fire billows above Peltzer Pines Christmas tree farm in Orange County, Calif., on Dec. 3, 2020. Extreme weather and supply chain issues could make Christmas trees harder to come by this holiday season. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Why Christmas trees may be harder to find this year (and what you can do about it)

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell walks between meetings with senators on Capitol Hill on Oct. 6 in Washington, D.C. The Fed kept its interest rates near zero at the end of its policy meeting on Wednesday and announced a plan to start removing some of the support it's providing to the economy. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Inflation is at a 30-year high. Here's how the Federal Reserve plans to deal with it

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PATRICK HERTZOG/AFP via Getty Images

Keep calm, it’s just the bullwhip effect

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The price of glass jars to hold pasta sauce and other products has soared during the pandemic. Sauce-maker Paul Guglielmo in Rochester, N.Y., has absorbed some of the increase, but he has also raised prices for consumers. Paul Guglielmo hide caption

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Paul Guglielmo

Cargo traffic jams affect glass bottles too. Your pantry staples could cost more

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An employee organizes an aisle at Mary Arnold Toys, New York City's oldest toy store, on Aug. 2. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

Santa's sleigh is looking emptier. Fewer toys, higher prices loom for holiday season

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Vehicles sit in a nearly empty lot at a car dealership in Richmond, Calif., on July 1. The global semiconductor shortage has hobbled auto production worldwide, making it difficult to find a car to buy. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

So, You Are Shopping For A Car At A Terrible Time. Here's What To Keep In Mind

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Nicole Wolter at work at her factory in Wauconda, Ill., which makes components for industrial machines. Wolter's company is straining to meet demand as her own suppliers struggle with short staffing. HM Manufacturing hide caption

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HM Manufacturing

How A Single Missing Part Can Hold Up $5 Million Machines And Unleash Industrial Hell

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Shipping containers are stacked high at the Port of Los Angeles in April. Supply chain disruptions are hitting small-business owners across the United States. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Cargo Is Piling Up Everywhere, And It's Making Inflation Worse

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Consumer prices jumped in March, marking a return of inflation, but the Federal Reserve insists any uptick will be temporary. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Consumer Prices Jumped. Should You Worry? That's Sparking A Heated Debate

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