NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

All Things Considered

U.S. Pressures Europe To Find Alternatives To Huawei

Corrected on February 16, 2020

A previous headline on this story incorrectly said Europe was pressuring the U.S. to find a low-cost alternative to Huawei. In fact, the U.S. was the one pressuring Europe.

Democrats Look Ahead, Elite Colleges Probed, CBP Chief Calls Agents 'Overzealous'

Corrected on February 15, 2020

A previous headline on this story incorrectly said the Border Patrol admitted mistakes in detaining Iranian Americans. It was actually the head of the Customs and Border Protection chief who made the announcement referring to CBP officers. The Border Patrol, which is a separate agency under CBP, was not involved in the detentions.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick Ends His Presidential Bid

Corrected on February 12, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we said Deval Patrick was one of two African American men to become governor of a state. Patrick is one of two who were elected to the position; two others were elevated from lieutenant governorships.

A Look At A Solemn Dignified Transfer Ritual For Fallen Soldiers

Corrected on February 11, 2020

An earlier version of this story said that 'transfer case' is a term used by the military instead of casket or coffin. Transfer cases are used for transporting fallen military members to Dover Air Force Base. Afterwards, the remains are placed in caskets and transported to their final resting places.

Everything You Need To Know About The New Hampshire Primary

Corrected on February 11, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said New Hampshire had the second-highest turnout in the 2016 general election. It had the third-highest turnout. The story also incorrectly said 48% of N.H. primary voters in 2004 identified as liberals. The number was actually 46%.

All Things Considered

Author Interview: 'Usual Cruelty'

Corrected on February 11, 2020

In this interview, and in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly refer to the book Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System as Usual Cruelty: The Complacency of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System.

Updated on Feb. 12
In the previous correction, we incorrectly used the title Unusual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System. The full, correct title is Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Remembering A Congressman Who Bucked His Party On An Impeachment

Corrected on February 10, 2020

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said that Rep. Tom Railsback's congressional district included Peoria, Illinois. Peoria was near his district but not in it. Also, an earlier version said Railsback was from the middle of Illinois; he was born in Moline, in the northwestern part of the state.

American With Coronavirus Dies At Hospital Near Center Of Epidemic

Corrected on February 8, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly called Wuhan a province in China. It's a city, the capital of Hubei province. In addition, a headline and the story had referred to the American who died as a man; the gender of that person has not been made known.

Where The 2020 Democrats Stand On Climate Change

Corrected on February 6, 2020

In this episode, we say that "nuclear energy generates about 20% of overall energy in the U.S." It would be more accurate to say that nuclear energy generates about 20% of overall electricity in the U.S.

What We Know About The App That Delayed Iowa's Caucus Results

Corrected on February 4, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Holly Christine Brown was appointed last week as the Asian/Pacific Islander caucus chair for the Iowa Democratic Party. Brown actually has been chair of her caucus for over a year but was appointed as a precinct chair last week.

What The 2020 Election Is All About

Corrected on February 2, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said George H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter are the only two incumbent presidents to have lost in the last 30 years. The time period is 40 years.

Morning Edition

News Brief: Impeachment Trial, Coronavirus, U.K.-Huawei Deal

Corrected on January 30, 2020

In this story, NPR's Mara Liasson discusses what she says was a question asked by Democrats and answered by Alan Dershowitz. It was actually Republican Sen. Ted Cruz who asked the question.

All Things Considered

The Singing Snow Plow Driver Of Bozeman, Mont.

Corrected on January 29, 2020

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly imply that "Wichita Lineman" was written by Glen Campbell. It was written by Jimmy Webb, while Campbell was the first to record the song and make it famous.

Morning Edition

75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Corrected on January 28, 2020

The initial radio version of this story featured one of the interviewees singing the song "Que Sera, Sera." She told us she sang that song to keep her spirits up during her imprisonment at Auschwitz. However, the song was first published in 1956. So, to avoid confusion, we removed that section in later broadcasts.

Everybody Knows Somebody

Corrected on January 27, 2020

A previous version of this episode incorrectly said that Anita Hill came forward to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee during the confirmation hearings for Clarence Thomas' appointment to the Supreme Court. She was subpoenaed to testify before the committee.

The Experience In, And Of, David Olney's Beloved Songs

Corrected on January 26, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that David Olney studied literature at the University of Carolina. There is no such school. Olney studied at the University of North Carolina.

Morning Edition

6 Men Successfully Cross Drake Passage In A Rowboat

Corrected on January 26, 2020

No official organization certifies which journey is considered the first human-powered row across the Drake Passage. A similar rowing expedition across the Drake Passage took place in 1988 and was led by Ned Gillette. The crew members used a sail at the start to help move their rowing craft from the rocky shore. The team rowed to Antarctica's outer islands, not its main peninsula.

All Things Considered

Peace Corps To End China Program

Corrected on January 25, 2020

In this audio, and in a previous introduction, based on information from congressional press releases, we incorrectly say Peace Corps volunteers will no longer be in China starting this summer. In fact, the China program will end in 2021.

PHOTOS: What It's Like Living Through An Outbreak

Corrected on January 25, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that workers in Seoul, South Korea, sprayed disinfectant in a train that came from Wuhan, China. The virus originated in Wuhan, not the train.

Got Impeachment Trial Milk? These Senators Do

Corrected on January 23, 2020

A caption with a previous version of this story incorrectly identified Sen. Jim Jeffords as an independent in 1999. At the time, he was a Republican. In 2001, he left the party to become an independent.

Most Americans Are Lonely, And Our Workplace Culture May Not Be Helping

Corrected on January 23, 2020

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said the survey found a 7% rise in loneliness since 2018. It was a nearly 13% rise. In addition, citing a draft version of the report, we incorrectly said that 72% of very heavy social media users were lonely, as compared with 51% of light users. The correct numbers, per the final report, are 73% and 52% respectively.

All Things Considered

Gun Rights Activists Descend On Virginia Capitol

Corrected on January 23, 2020

This story incorrectly identifies a speaker at the rally as Jeff Katz. In fact, the comments were made by Erich Pratt of Gun Owners of America.

Can You Name Five Fine Artists That Are Women?

Corrected on January 22, 2020

In the original version of this episode, we incorrectly said that the Baltimore Museum of Art will be opening its Joan Mitchell exhibition this April. The exhibition is actually scheduled to open this September.

Morning Edition

Psychologists Who Helped Develop CIA Torture Program To Testify In Sept. 11 Case

Corrected on January 21, 2020

A previous version of the headline and Web summary said that pretrial hearings and testimony would begin Tuesday at the U.S. military court in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. In fact, those have been ongoing, and it's the testimony of two psychologists that is planned starting Tuesday.

Trump Says Iran Is 'Standing Down,' Vows To Continue Pressure

Corrected on January 9, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the nuclear agreement with Iran limited Iran's ability to pursue nuclear weapons in return for millions of dollars of Iranian assets that had been held by the United States. The amount was billions of dollars.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Puzzle: Supermarket Wordplay

Corrected on January 5, 2020

This week's puzzle has been updated to replace a previously incorrect clue.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Ofra Bloch On 'Afterward'

Corrected on January 5, 2020

In this report, as well as in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly say that Ofra Bloch is the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors. She grew up in Jerusalem, where she was surrounded by Holocaust survivors.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Thousands Mourn Soleimani In Baghdad

Corrected on January 4, 2020

In this story, we incorrectly say that as of Saturday, the State Department was urging Americans to leave Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.

7 Women's Health Topics We Need To Talk About In 2020

Corrected on January 2, 2020

A previous version of this story incorrectly gave the title of the book Periods Gone Public: Taking A Stand For Menstrual Equity as Periods Gone Public: Taking A Stand For Menstrual Equality.

Grim And Hopeful Global Trends To Watch In 2020 (And Fold Into A Zine)

Corrected on January 2, 2020

An earlier version of this story misspelled Matt Deitsch's last name as Diestch. Also, three things that happened in 2019 were mistakenly said to have happened "this year": the dozen countries that reported cases of vaccine-derived polio; the freezing and reinstatement of aid to El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras; and NPR's interview with Matt Deitsch. Additionally, the new dengue vaccine is expected for this year, not next year.