NPR Corrections

NPR corrects significant errors in broadcast and online reports. Corrections of errors will be made in audio archives, written transcripts and on the website. To report an error, please use our corrections form.

Mass Incarceration

Corrected on August 15, 2019

In the original version of this episode an incorrect date was given for Earl Warren's vice presidential bid. It was in 1948, not 1944.

All Things Considered

Dow Tumbles 800 Points As Bond Markets Signal Recession

Corrected on August 14, 2019

In previous audio and Web versions of this story, we said that China's industrial output fell to a 17-year low. In fact, it is the growth in industrial output that fell that low.

How Bad Is Pakistan's Plastic Bag Problem? See For Yourself

Corrected on August 14, 2019

An earlier version of this story mistakenly said 2018 was the year for the study about rivers' contributions of plastic pollution into oceans. The year is actually 2017. Additionally, a summary on the homepage incorrectly said the plastic bag ban was for Pakistan. It's actually for just Islamabad and surrounding areas.

All Things Considered

Bernie Sanders Again Attacks Amazon — This Time Pulling In 'The Washington Post'

Corrected on August 13, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Amazon and The Washington Post share a parent company. The newspaper is not directly connected to the online retailer. Additionally, a Web summary on the homepage incorrectly said Bezos owns Amazon. He is the founder and CEO.

Here's Why The Census Bureau May Be In Your Neighborhood Before The 2020 Count

Corrected on August 13, 2019

Because of imprecise wording on the Census Bureau's website, a previous version of this story said around 50,000 temporary Census Bureau employees are expected to conduct address canvassing for the 2020 census. In fact, the bureau is planning to train around 50,000 people, 40,000 of whom are expected to complete the training and do canvassing in the field.

Morning Edition

Careful With Those Birthday Candles, Smokey: Beloved Bear Turns 75

Corrected on August 9, 2019

Previous audio and Web versions of this story incorrectly stated that the 1942 attack on an oil field in Southern California was the only Japanese attack on the mainland in World War II. It was not the only attack. Additionally, in the audio version the Los Padres National Forest is incorrectly referred to as Los Alamos National Forest.

Morning Edition

Puerto Rico's Governor Crisis

Corrected on August 7, 2019

In this broadcast, we incorrectly say that the Puerto Rican Supreme Court is trying to take action against the new governor. The court is set to rule on a lawsuit against him.

Morning Edition

Toni Morrison's Legacy

Corrected on August 7, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Toni Morrison was the only American to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature since John Steinbeck won in 1962.

All Things Considered

'West End Blues'

Corrected on August 4, 2019

A previous Web version of this story misstated the first name of the banjo player Mancy Carr as Manny.

Surgeons Remove More Than 500 Teeth From Boy In India

Corrected on August 3, 2019

A previous version of this story included a tweet from The New Indian Express that incorrectly said the operation took five hours. After the mass was removed, it took five hours for doctors to extract the teeth from the baglike specimen, according to the hospital.

Ask Me Another

Browsing History

Corrected on August 2, 2019

A previous version of the American history quiz on this podcast incorrectly said Sally Ride was the first woman in space. She was the first American woman in space.

Opera Star David Daniels Indicted For Sexual Assault In Texas

Corrected on August 1, 2019

A previous version of this article, using information provided by a spokesperson for the Houston Police Department, said that David Daniels and Scott Walters were arrested for sexual assault in Ann Arbor, Mich., and extradited to Texas. Daniels and Walters posted bail in Michigan and were released from custody.

We also said that Daniels, along with the University of Michigan, was a defendant in the civil suit filed by Andrew Lipian in October 2018. In February, Daniels was dismissed without prejudice as a party in that suit; there are currently no civil claims against him.

Irritating Compounds Can Show Up In 'Vape Juice'

Corrected on July 30, 2019

A previous version of this story misquoted Juul spokesperson Lindsay Andrews as saying levels of "acetate" exceeded real-world exposures in the study. Andrews was actually referring to vanillin, which is an aldehyde.

All Things Considered

Resurrected Stones Film Finds Pivot Point In Rock History

Corrected on July 26, 2019

Because of a production error, in a previous version of this report the photo of Keith Richards, John Lennon and Eric Clapton was reversed and made it appear as if they were left-handed guitarists.

Missouri Firm With Silicon Valley Ties Faces Medicare Billing Scrutiny

Corrected on July 26, 2019

An earlier version of this story said Cerner had committed $266 million over the next 10 years to Lumeris. In fact, the $266 million stock purchase last year was immediate. A separate agreement on a 10-year collaboration between Cerner and Lumeris was made at the same time.

Wednesday, July 24th, 2019

Corrected on July 24, 2019

In this episode, we incorrectly say that NPR's Aarti Shahani was in Silicon Valley. In fact, she was in New York.

Morning Edition

In Germany, Working Mothers Say They Face Job Discrimination

Corrected on July 22, 2019

In a previous version of this report, we referred to Ursula von der Leyen as the likely next president of the European Council. She is actually going to be president of the European Commission.

Music Trumps Moon Landing

Corrected on July 20, 2019

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the date of the concert as July 21, 1969.

Morning Edition

Sculptor Augusta Savage Said Her Legacy Was The Work Of Her Students

Corrected on July 18, 2019

In the audio version of this report, we say Wendy Ikemoto curated the "Augusta Savage: Renaissance Woman" show in New York. Ikemoto is associate curator of American art at the New-York Historical Society Museum & Library. It is more accurate to say she coordinated the show. Jeffreen Hayes originally curated the show, for the Cummer Museum of Arts & Gardens in Jacksonville, Fla.

GOP Puts Google Search On Trial In DC

Corrected on July 17, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Facebook and Google attended an April hearing. It should have said that Facebook and Twitter attended.

Morning Edition

These Are The People Struggling The Most To Pay Back Student Loans

Corrected on July 16, 2019

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that when you're in default, and you get older, you can lose your Social Security. In fact, the federal government can take part, not all, of your monthly Social Security benefits.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Simple Ways To Prevent Falls In Older Adults

Corrected on July 15, 2019

A previous Web version of this story stated that Sudafed is an anticholinergic. It is not, but the more commonly available Sudafed PE is.

All Things Considered

States Are Ratcheting Up Reading Expectations For 3rd-Graders

Corrected on July 15, 2019

A previous Web version of this report said Common Core emanated from the federal government. In fact, it was developed by governors, state school officers and education experts. The federal government did provide incentives for states to adopt it.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Colson Whitehead On 'The Nickel Boys'

Corrected on July 13, 2019

An earlier headline on this story misspelled the title of author Colson Whitehead's latest novel. It is The Nickel Boys, not The Nickle Boys.

When Failure Is A 4-Letter Word

Corrected on July 12, 2019

In a previous version of this episode, we mistakenly said Lagos is the capital of Nigeria. In fact, Abuja is the capital.

Will Your Job Still Exist In 2030?

Corrected on July 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that radiologists don't require a bachelor's degree. Radiology technicians don't require a bachelor's degree.

João Gilberto, Master Of Bossa Nova, Dies At 88

Corrected on July 9, 2019

A previous version of this story suggested that in the recording of "Girl from Ipanema" by Stan Getz, João Gilberto and Astrud Gilberto, English lyrics sung by Astrud were a translation of the Portuguese lyrics sung by João. They are distinct verses.

U.S. Women's Soccer Team Wins World Cup Title For A 4th Time

Corrected on July 7, 2019

An earlier version of this story misspelled Stefanie van der Gragt's first name as Stephanie. Additionally, the original headline on this story referred to the U.S. women's soccer team's World Cup victory as a "four-peat." The victory sealed the team's fourth World Cup championship overall, not its fourth in a row.

UNESCO Adds Ruins Of Ancient Babylon To Its List Of World Heritage Sites

Corrected on July 7, 2019

Because of incorrect information provided by The Associated Press, a previous version of the photo caption at the top of this story incorrectly described the structure in the photo as Ishtar Gate, which it is not. Additionally, we mistakenly said the ancient site of Babylon features hanging gardens. The existence of those gardens has not been definitively established. And we incorrectly said that Babylon had been listed as an endangered World Heritage site. Babylon was recently added as a World Heritage site, but it's not on the List of World Heritage in Danger.

Morning Edition

Iran Says It Exceeded Enriched Uranium Cap

Corrected on July 2, 2019

In this report, we say that Corey Hinderstein served in the Department of Energy during the Obama administration. It would be more accurate to say she was at DOE from January 2014 to November 2017, which also includes much of President Trump's first year in office.

LA Angels' Pitcher Tyler Skaggs Dies At 27

Corrected on July 1, 2019

A previous version of this story and the summary that appeared on the homepage incorrectly said Tyler Skaggs was due to pitch Monday night.

3 Memoirs That Explore The Many Facets Of Mental Illness

Corrected on July 1, 2019

An earlier version of this story mistakenly called the National Alliance on Mental Illness by its earlier name, the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill.

Previously posted on June 28, 2019: A previous version of this story said One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest came out in 1984. The novel was published in 1962, and the movie version was released in 1975.

All Things Considered

Youth Express Themselves At New York Pride Event

Corrected on June 30, 2019

We incorrectly say siblings Wyatt and Elliott McDaniel traveled from Syracuse, Ind., to celebrate Youth Pride in New York. They came from Syracuse, N.Y.

Disease Watch: What Global Travelers Should Know In Summer 2019

Corrected on June 29, 2019

A previous version of this post incorrectly stated that a booster is recommended if it has been a decade since a previous vaccination for yellow fever. In fact, the booster shot is no longer considered necessary, according to WHO.

Morning Edition

Iran's U.N. Ambassador: U.S. Escalating Hostilities Like A 'Knife Under Your Throat'

Corrected on June 27, 2019

In the audio of this story, we incorrectly refer to Majid Takht Ravanchi as ambassador to the United States. Ravanchi is the ambassador to the United Nations.

Previously posted June 24: In a previous version of this story, Majid Takht Ravanchi's last name was incorrectly spelled Ravanichi in some references.

All Things Considered

Why Facebook Won't Kick Off A Warlord

Corrected on June 26, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to Mohamed Suliman as Mohamed Salih. Additionally, the quote about story commonalities was from Lwin, not Lewis.

Code Switch Book Club, Summer 2019

Corrected on June 25, 2019

In previous audio and Web versions of this story, Victoria W. Wolcott's first name was incorrectly given as Virginia.

Previously posted June 20, 2019: A previous version of this story misspelled author Ibi Zoboi's last name as Zaboi.

Music For Plants Is Real (Even If The Science Isn't)

Corrected on June 24, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly attributed the quotation that begins, "We're at this pivotal moment ... " to Joe Patitucci. It was actually his Data Garden colleague Jon Shapiro who said that.

2020 Democrats Offer Up Affordable Housing Plans Amid Surging Prices

Corrected on June 21, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Sen. Elizabeth Warren's housing plan includes a refundable tax credit for renters. While other candidates' plans include this proposal, Warren's plan does not. Also, a previous version said that Warren's plan would help homebuyers living in areas where black families were once excluded. It should have read, "where black families were once excluded from getting home loans."

All Things Considered

Alabama's Africatown Hopes For Revival After Slave Ship Discovery

Corrected on June 21, 2019

Clarification: A previous version of this story referred to the slave ship Clotilda as Clotilde, which is a common alternative spelling.

Previously posted June 19: A previous version of this story incorrectly spelled a reference to Darron Patterson's last name as Paterson.

As Polar Ice Cap Recedes, The U.S. Navy Looks North

Corrected on June 16, 2019

A previous version of this story said that the Trump administration's Arctic strategy was expected sometime in June. In fact, it was released on June 6, before this article was published.

Emails Connect Census Official With GOP Strategist On Citizenship Question

Corrected on June 15, 2019

Because of incorrect information on the Census Bureau's website, a previous version of this story said Christa Jones serves as the chief of staff to the bureau's director, Steven Dillingham. In fact, Jones is serving as chief of staff to the bureau's deputy director, Ron Jarmin.

Morning Edition

A Brief History Of U.S.-Mexican Relations

Corrected on June 14, 2019

We incorrectly say President Harry Truman was the first U.S. president to visit Mexico. In fact, President William Howard Taft was the first.

New York Ends Religious Exemptions For Required Vaccines

Corrected on June 14, 2019

A previous version of this story misspelled a reference to Kenneth Zebrowski's last name as Zebrowsky.

Previously posted June 13: A previous version of this story misspelled several references to John Liu's last name as Lui.

All Things Considered

Democratic Sen. Mark Warner Discusses Election Laws And Interference

Corrected on June 14, 2019

In a conversation with Sen. Mark Warner, we quoted Rep. Andy Levin incompletely from a newspaper report. While the congressman said he did not think that President Trump's comments were impeachable, he did say he found them "disqualifying."

We Drink Basically The Same Wine Varietals As Ancient Romans, And That's Not So Great

Corrected on June 14, 2019

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the genes of certain domesticated grape varieties are frozen in time. In fact, domesticated grapes have evolved, though in some cases, humans have slowed down this evolution. The original story implied that limited diversity among grape varieties will cause the wine industry to fail; more accurately, this could be a problem for the industry. The story and headline have also been clarified to say that while many modern wine grape varieties are genetically similar to those in ancient times, fermenting, bottling and storing techniques have all changed, all of which can affect the taste of wine.

Who Made The Cut: DNC Announces Primary Debate Contenders

Corrected on June 13, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said John Delaney is a current representative. He did not seek reelection in the 2018 midterms. In addition, we said Steve Bullock was the last of the 23 candidates named in the story to enter the race. Bill de Blasio entered the race two days after Bullock did.

Morning Edition

NASA Engineers Try To Remedy Stuck Probe On Mars

Corrected on June 12, 2019

We incorrectly say mission managers plan to move a support structure out of the way this week. They're actually planning to do it sometime later in June.

All Things Considered

Democratic Presidential Debates Could Reignite Warren-Biden Bankruptcy Fight

Corrected on June 11, 2019

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly say Joe Biden was the ranking member of the Judiciary Committee in 2005. Although he had held that position previously, he did not in 2005. In addition, we misspelled Terrell McSweeny's last name as McSweeney.

All Things Considered

University Of Alabama Returns $21.5 Million To Hugh Culverhouse

Corrected on June 10, 2019

An earlier headline did not make clear that while Hugh Culverhouse pledged $26.5 million to the University of Alabama, his donations so far had totaled $21.5 million. That amount has been returned and the university is not accepting the rest of his pledge.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Nicole Dennis-Benn On 'Patsy'

Corrected on June 9, 2019

A previous Web introduction to this story incorrectly said Nicole Dennis-Benn spoke with Lulu Garcia-Navarro. Dennis-Benn spoke with Barrie Hardymon.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Why South Korea Is Sending $8 Million In Food Aid To North Korea

Corrected on June 9, 2019

A previous version of this story referred to kimchi as a "Chinese cabbage dish." It is best known as a fermented food made with cabbage, often of the Chinese variety. But it is a Korean dish.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Opinion: Ex-Prosecutor Faces Harsh Criticism After 'Central Park 5' Netflix Series

Corrected on June 8, 2019

In the audio of this story, in addition to a previous Web version, we incorrectly say Linda Fairstein was a founder of the sex crimes unit of the Manhattan District Attorney's Office. She was actually named chief of the unit two years after it was created, a position she held for 25 years.

Kris Kobach Discussed Census Citizenship Question With 2016 Trump Campaign

Corrected on June 8, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that plaintiffs in one of the lawsuits over the citizenship question allege that the Trump administration wants to use the question to draw new voting districts that benefit non-white Hispanic people. In fact, the plaintiffs allege the strategy is to benefit non-Hispanic white people.

Early Abortion Bans: Which States Have Passed Them?

Corrected on June 6, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Utah's new early-abortion ban makes no exceptions for rape or incest. In fact, the law does allow for such exceptions if the doctor performing the abortion verifies that the incident was reported to law enforcement.

Morning Edition

Listeners Ask About The History Of U.S. Abortion Laws

Corrected on June 5, 2019

In an earlier version of this report, Cokie Roberts said she had not found any advertisements for abortion providers in 19th century newspapers. There are in fact examples of abortion providers advertising at that time.

Morning Edition

Should Racehorses Be Medicated?

Corrected on June 5, 2019

A previous version of this story said Kathy Guillermo of PETA doesn't want to end horse racing. In fact, Guillermo says, "PETA is opposed to racing and all sports involving animals. But it's not enough to just say stop it. We want to end the cruelties and improve conditions for horses immediately."

Episode 875: Why Did The Cow Cross The Border?

Corrected on June 5, 2019

In a previous Web version of this podcast, we incorrectly said imports and exports of beef totaled 500 million tons each. The actual amount for each category is 500 million pounds.

All Things Considered

Leah Chase, The 'Queen Of Creole Cuisine,' Dies At 96

Corrected on June 2, 2019

In a previous Web version of this story, a quote from scholar Jessica Harris was misattributed to the late chef, Leah Chase. It was Harris who told NPR that "In the bad old days when African Americans could not eat elsewhere," they ate at Chase's New Orleans restaurant Dooky Chase's.

Another Tick-Borne Disease To Worry About

Corrected on June 1, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the Centers for Disease Control and Infection.

All Things Considered

'They Know That I'm The Real Deal': Transgender Baritone Makes Opera History

Corrected on June 1, 2019

In the audio of this story, as well as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say Lucia Lucas is the first known trans person to play a principal role in an opera on a U.S. stage. While she is the first known trans woman to do so, trans male opera singer Adrian Angelico performed in the U.S. in 2017.

Morning Edition

A Sea Of Sagebrush Disappears, Making Way For Fire-Prone Cheatgrass

Corrected on June 1, 2019

In the audio of this story, as well as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly describe the sage grouse as endangered. The Interior Department said in 2015 that the bird does not need protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Previously posted on May 30: In an earlier audio of this story, as well as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly said the Maggie Creek Ranch was north of Elko, Nev. It is located southwest of the city.

Morning Edition

Privately Funded Border Wall Near Completion In New Mexico

Corrected on May 31, 2019

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said the border wall in Sunland, N.M., stands 310 feet tall. The barrier is actually about 18 feet tall and runs along an incline that climbs to 310 feet.

Savarkar's India

Corrected on May 31, 2019

A previous version of this episode incorrectly said India gained independence from Britain on June 15, 1947. India officially became independent on Aug. 15, 1947.

Samin Nosrat Is Making Space At The Table

Corrected on May 30, 2019

A previous version of this story misstated the subtitle of Samin Nosrat's book Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking as Mastering the Art of Good Cooking.

All Things Considered

Bill Buckner, Red Sox Scapegoat Later Embraced By Fans, Dies

Corrected on May 28, 2019

In this story, we incorrectly say that the Mets went on to win the World Series the night after Bill Buckner's error. In fact, the decisive seventh game was played two nights later because of a rainout.

Who's On NPR?

Corrected on May 28, 2019

A previous version of this story listed On The Media as a PRI/PRX program. It is produced by WNYC Studios.

Weekend Edition Saturday

A Little Luck 'Not A Bad Thing' In Baseball

Corrected on May 28, 2019

In the audio introduction to this story, as in a previous Web version, we incorrectly say that Bill Buckner won the Gold Glove award.

NPR's Summer Movie Guide: 27 Films Coming Soon To Theaters

Corrected on May 24, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the film Paris Is Burning is in black and white. It is in color.

Previously posted on May 22: A previous of this story version mistakenly stated that RZA had not appeared in previous Jim Jarmusch films. In fact, he appeared briefly in both 1999's Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai and 2003's Coffee and Cigarettes.

All Things Considered

How Trump Breaks With Clinton And Nixon On Governing While Under Investigation

Corrected on May 23, 2019

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said Kenneth Starr's memoir came out in 2017. It was published in 2018. In addition, the story said there were no American casualties in the Kosovo war. Two U.S. soldiers were killed when their helicopter crashed in May 1999, but they were considered noncombat fatalities.

Episode 913: Counting The Homeless

Corrected on May 21, 2019

A previous version of this show stated that Phoenix had housed every homeless veteran. But according to Community Solutions, although there is funding to house all veterans, not every homeless veteran has been housed.

Fresh Air

'Fresh Air' Remembers Hollywood Legend Doris Day

Corrected on May 21, 2019

Doris Day was 97 at the time of her death. In this broadcast after she died, we say we had interviewed her in 2012 just before her 88th birthday. That was the information we had from Day at the time of the interview. But based on her birth certificate, which was obtained more recently by The Associated Press, Day was born in 1922, not 1924 as was widely believed. That made her one day shy of 90 years old at the time of the 2012 Fresh Air broadcast — two years older than we had stated at the time.

Morning Edition

Supreme Court To Hear Controversial Census Citizenship Question

Corrected on May 21, 2019

In this story, we said 1950 was the last time a citizenship question was asked for the U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say the 1950 census was the last time a question about citizenship was among the census questions for all households, although the question was asked only of people born outside the United States. In some later censuses, a sample of households were asked a citizenship question.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Phoenix Mayor On Census Immigration Question

Corrected on May 21, 2019

In this story, we said 1950 was the last time a citizenship question was asked for the U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say the 1950 census was the last time a question about citizenship was among the census questions for all households, although the question was asked only of people born outside the United States. In some later censuses, a sample of households were asked a citizenship question.

All Things Considered

California Sues Trump Administration Over Citizenship Question On 2020 Census

Corrected on May 21, 2019

In this story, we said 1950 was the last time a citizenship question was asked for the U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say the 1950 census was the last time a question about citizenship was among the census questions for all households, although the question was asked only of people born outside the United States. In some later censuses, a sample of households were asked a citizenship question.

2020 Census Will Ask About Respondents' Citizenship Status

Corrected on May 21, 2019

An earlier version of this story said 1950 was the last time a citizenship question was asked for the U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say the 1950 census was the last time a question about citizenship was among the census questions for all households, although the question was asked only of people born outside the United States. In some later censuses, a sample of households were asked a citizenship question.

In France, The #MeToo Movement Has Yet To Live Up To Women's Hopes

Corrected on May 20, 2019

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said that the Boston Philharmonic had cut ties with conductor Charles Dutoit. It was actually the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Previously posted on May 19: In the audio, we incorrectly give the first name of singer Anne-Sophie Schmidt as Sophie.

All Things Considered

I.M. Pei, Architect Of Some Of The World's Most Iconic Structures, Dies At 102

Corrected on May 20, 2019

A previous Web version of this story mistakenly said the Louvre's Pyramid opened in 1988; it opened in 1989.

Previously posted on May 17: In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we say that I.M. Pei was born in Suzhou, China. In fact, he was born in Guangzhou.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Academics Gather To Study Phish, Man

Corrected on May 19, 2019

In a previous version of this story the reporter incorrectly identified the university. It is Oregon State University, not University of Oregon.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Deported After Living In The U.S. For 26 Years, He Navigates A New Life In Mexico

Corrected on May 19, 2019

A previous Web version of this story identified Gilberto Olivas-Bejarano's birth city as León, Mexico, and said his parents moved from that city to the United States. In fact, Olivas-Bejarano was born in Chihuahua, and his parents left for the U.S. from that city.

New HIV Map Offers Most Detailed Look Yet At The Epidemic

Corrected on May 15, 2019

The labels for Botswana and Zimbabwe were mistakenly transposed in a previous version of the map. Also, in an earlier version of this story, the organization ICAP was referred to by its former name, the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs.

All Things Considered

How A Shirt From Target Helped A Survivor Of Deadly Amtrak Crash Heal

Corrected on May 10, 2019

In a previous audio version of this story, as well as in a previous Web version and caption, we incorrectly said the 2015 train derailment occurred outside Philadelphia. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, the accident happened within the city limits.

Morning Edition

Soccer Fans Are In Disbelief After Liverpool Beats Barcelona 4-0

Corrected on May 8, 2019

In this story, Wright Thompson incorrectly says the Champions League is made up of the best teams from leagues all over the world. The Champions League is a tournament involving only the top European clubs.

PHOTOS: A New Addition To The Royal Baby Album

Corrected on May 8, 2019

A previous caption on this story incorrectly said that Elizabeth II's husband, Phillip, did not have the title Duke of Edinburgh in 1950. He received that title when they were married in 1947. In addition, another caption called Prince Charles' then-wife, Diana, Duchess of Wales. Her title was Princess of Wales.

In 'Ask Dr. Ruth,' The Famous Sex Therapist Looks Inward At Last

Corrected on May 8, 2019

A previous Web version of this story said Ruth Westheimer had fled to Switzerland in the late 1930s after her parents died. In fact, her family sent her to Switzerland. Her relatives died in the Holocaust.

Previously posted on May 5: A previous Web version of this story stated that Ruth Westheimer is seen in a documentary putting together a stun gun. She is putting together a Sten gun.

Ask Me Another

Doppel-Bängers

Corrected on May 6, 2019

In this game, we incorrectly refer to the title of a Chuck Berry song as "Sweet Sixteen." The correct title is "Sweet Little Sixteen."

Weekend Edition Saturday

Inside The Life Of Famous Sex Educator, Dr. Ruth

Corrected on May 4, 2019

The audio for this story incorrectly states that the documentary Ask Dr. Ruth is currently out on Hulu. The documentary premieres on Hulu on June 1, 2019.

The Mississippi River Has Been Flooding For 41 Days Now

Corrected on May 3, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said a major league baseball stadium in Davenport, Iowa, is surrounded by water. It's actually a minor league team's stadium. We also previously misspelled Tiphanie Cannon's first name as Tiffany.

Morning Edition

Trump Administration Has Drastically Dropped Visas For Afghan And Iraqi Interpreters

Corrected on May 3, 2019

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web version, we conflate the number of Iraqis waiting in a backlog of the Special Immigrant Visa Program with those in the backlog for the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program P-2 Direct Access Program. According to the State Department, there are only 200 Iraqis still waiting for visas from the SIV program. The backlog of Iraqis in the DAP program is over 100,000.

British Judge Sentences Julian Assange To 50 Weeks In Prison

Corrected on May 2, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Julian Assange was wanted on charges of rape and sexual misconduct in Sweden. Assange was not charged. Swedish investigators had wanted to question him about allegations of rape and sexual misconduct in an investigation that was dropped in 2017.

Is Measles Here To Stay?

Corrected on April 30, 2019

An earlier version of this story misspelled Thomas C. Peebles' last name as Pebbles.

Toro Y Moi: Tiny Desk Concert

Corrected on April 30, 2019

A previous Web introduction to this story stated that performer Chaz Bundick goes by the name Chaz Bear. The musician changed his name legally to Chaz Bear in 2016.

Weekend Edition Saturday

GOP Take On The Big Democratic Field

Corrected on April 29, 2019

In this interview, John Weaver incorrectly says no Republicans have decided to run for president. In fact, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld formally declared his candidacy on April 15.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Echoes Of Watergate Today

Corrected on April 28, 2019

The introduction to this story incorrectly states that Richard Nixon was impeached. In fact, while the House Judiciary Committee approved three articles of impeachment, Nixon resigned, and the full House of Representatives never voted on the impeachment articles.

Trump Moves To Withdraw U.S. From U.N. Arms Trade Treaty

Corrected on April 26, 2019

A previous version of this story said more than 100 countries have ratified the Arms Trade Treaty. In fact, just under 100 have ratified it while several more abide by its provisions without formal ratification.

Morning Edition

Health Officials Warn The Measles Outbreak Is Accelerating

Corrected on April 26, 2019

In this story, global health correspondent Michaeleen Doucleff says she needed a booster of the measles vaccine when she was pregnant. But she meant to say she needed the booster before she got pregnant.

All Things Considered

Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk

Corrected on April 25, 2019

In a previous Web version of this story, Chethan Pandarinath's surname was misspelled as Pandarinth and Yahia H. Ali's first name was misspelled as Yahio. Additionally, we said Pandarinath was affiliated with Georgia Tech and Ali with Emory. In fact, they each are affiliated with both institutions.

Meal Kits Have A Smaller Carbon Footprint Than Grocery Shopping, Study Says

Corrected on April 25, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the red meat meal kit tested had slightly less of a carbon footprint than its grocery store equivalent. In fact, the researchers looked at cheeseburgers, and in that case, the cheeseburgers purchased at the grocery store had less of a carbon footprint than their meal kit equivalent.

Fresh Air

Reporter Details Neglect And Disaster In The U.S. Navy

Corrected on April 25, 2019

In this story, we incorrectly say the USS Fitzgerald collided with a cargo ship in the South China Sea. The USS Fitzgerald was en route to the South China Sea, but the collision took place off the coast of Japan.

All Things Considered

The Complicated History Of The U.S. Census Asking About Citizenship

Corrected on April 25, 2019

In this story, we incorrectly imply the U.S. census did not ask about citizenship status for the national head counts between 1840 and 1890. In fact, questions for the 1870 census included, "Is this person a male citizen of the United States of 21 years or upwards?"

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Corrected on April 24, 2019

In this report, we incorrectly refer to Julián Castro as a House member. In fact, he is not a member of Congress.

Bernie Sanders Releases A Decade Of Tax Returns

Corrected on April 23, 2019

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said the O'Rourkes' charitable giving amounted to 0.03 percent of their income. It was actually 0.3 percent.

The Mystery Of Julian Assange's Cat

Corrected on April 22, 2019

In a previous version of this story, we referred to Chelsea Manning as a former Army intelligence officer. Manning was an Army specialist, not an officer, but was an intelligence analyst.

Cate Le Bon Comes 'Home To You'

Corrected on April 17, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that director Phil Collins is German. He is based in Germany but is originally from England.

Morning Edition

Trump Begins Effort To Flip Minnesota, Which Was A Democratic Holdout In 2016

Corrected on April 16, 2019

An earlier version of this story said that Minnesota had the longest streak of voting for Democratic presidential candidates, going back to 1972. It is the state with the longest such streak; the District of Columbia has backed Democratic presidential candidates since 1964, when the District first gained three electoral votes.

The Maple Syrup Cartel

Corrected on April 15, 2019

A previous version of the Web story incorrectly said Canada's government set up maple syrup production quotas and a reserve. In fact, production quotas and a reserve were created solely in the province of Quebec, and they were created by maple syrup producers, not by the Canadian government.

No More Magic: Johnson Abruptly Resigns From The LA Lakers

Corrected on April 10, 2019

A previous version of this story said Magic Johnson retired from basketball in 1991. He first announced his retirement then but came back to be part of the U.S. Olympic "Dream Team" in 1992 and then again to play for the Lakers in the 1995-96 season. Additionally, we incorrectly said the Lakers haven't made the playoffs in three years. The team hasn't made the playoffs in six years.

Morning Edition

Prenatal Testing Can Ease Minds Or Heighten Anxieties

Corrected on April 8, 2019

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly listed Fragile X syndrome as an example of an autosomal recessive disease. In fact, Fragile X syndrome follows an X-linked dominant pattern of inheritance.

'We Don't Have Enough Women In Power': Notre Dame Coach Muffet McGraw Goes Viral

Corrected on April 6, 2019

In an earlier version of this story, we quote Muffet McGraw as saying the Equal Rights Amendment was introduced in 1967. A version of the amendment was first introduced in 1923, and it was reintroduced in subsequent years. The draft of the amendment approved by Congress in 1972 remains just shy of full ratification by the states.

All Things Considered

As Airbnb Grows, So Do The Problems Cities Have With It

Corrected on April 6, 2019

In this interview, a guest incorrectly says that Airbnb has spent over a million dollars to overturn regulations in San Diego. The amount spent is actually more than a half-million dollars.

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Corrected on April 4, 2019

In an earlier version of this podcast, we incorrectly recapped Rudy Giuliani's comment about Democrats. Giuliani said Democrats hate the current president of the United States. He did not say Democrats hate the United States.

Morning Edition

News Brief: Ethiopia Crash Report, Biden, Texas ICE Raid

Corrected on April 4, 2019

In an earlier version of the audio, we incorrectly recapped Rudy Giuliani's comment about Democrats. Giuliani said Democrats hate the current president of the United States. He did not say Democrats hate the United States.

Morning Edition

LifeWay Christian Closing Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores

Corrected on April 4, 2019

Chas Sisk's last name was previously misspelled as Cisk in both photo credits. And Fredericksburg, Va., was incorrectly referred to as Frederickburg.

Previously posted on March 28: A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to LifeWay's publishing imprint as Broadman and Holdman. The imprint is Broadman and Holman.

Morning Edition

Tuesday's 3-way Race For Ferguson City Council Draws Attention

Corrected on April 2, 2019

In this report we mistakenly say that if Lezley McSpadden is elected to the Ferguson City Council, it will be the first time that board will have a black majority. In fact, there was a black majority on the city council for a few months in early 2016.

Amid Scandal, Baltimore Mayor Takes Indefinite, Health-Related Leave

Corrected on April 1, 2019

In an earlier version of this story, we mistakenly said that Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh had resigned. She is actually taking a leave of absence. Additionally, we also said that she resigned from the board of the University of Maryland Medical System on March 20. The date was actually March 18.

Better Than Cash: How Awards Can Shape Our Behavior

Corrected on March 29, 2019

In this episode of Hidden Brain, we discuss the Nobel Prize awarded to Bob Dylan in 2016. It is implied in the conversation that Dylan rejected this award. While Dylan did not attend the public ceremony at which Nobel winners typically receive their award, he did accept the prize.

Morning Edition

Why Pedestrian Deaths Are At A 30-Year High

Corrected on March 28, 2019

A previous version of the Web story incorrectly cited the number of pedestrian deaths in California in 2018. The figure cited, 432, represents only the first half of 2018, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association. Also, a previous version of the audio included a statement that said a distracted driver, traveling at highway speeds, could travel the distance of four football fields in 4 seconds. It's more like the distance of one football field.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Barr Faces Pressure Over Mueller Report

Corrected on March 24, 2019

In an earlier audio version of this story, our correspondent misspoke and indicated the courts are under the control of the Justice Department. The federal judiciary is a separate branch of government.

Friday, March 22nd, 2019

Corrected on March 22, 2019

In this report we incorrectly refer to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as president.

All Things Considered

Among False Claims, Trump Attacked McCain For Failing Veterans

Corrected on March 22, 2019

A previous version of this story said John McCain was a co-sponsor of a 2018 Veterans Affairs bill. In fact, while that bill was named in his honor, he did not co-sponsor it. He co-sponsored an earlier Veterans Choice law.

The Student Strike That Changed Higher Ed Forever

Corrected on March 22, 2019

Because of incorrect information provided by The Associated Press, the original caption on the photo of demonstrators said they were at San Francisco State College. The actual location is unclear.

Why #ThisIsMyHustle Is Trending In Nigeria

Corrected on March 21, 2019

An earlier version of this story misspelled Bashir Ahmad's last name as Ahmed. Additionally, we said Kanayo F. Nwanze is the president of the International Fund for Agricultural Development and wrote a piece for its website. In fact, he is the former president of the organization and wrote the piece for a different agency's website.

Trump Backs Public Release Of Mueller Report

Corrected on March 20, 2019

In a previous version of this story, Robert Mueller's last name was incorrectly given as Muller in a number of references, including the photo caption.

Morning Edition

Westbrook-Fan Incident May Spur NBA To Do More To Shield Players

Corrected on March 14, 2019

In this report, William Rhoden says a fan called Marcus Smart the N-word. Smart told his coaching staff that the fan called him the N-word, but a Texas Tech investigation said no racial slur was heard.

Morning Edition

Gov. Gavin Newsom Suspends Death Penalty In California

Corrected on March 14, 2019

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said 18 states and the District of Columbia don't have the death penalty. In fact, 20 states and the District of Columbia don't have the death penalty, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Tuesday, March 12th, 2019

Corrected on March 12, 2019

In the discussion of potential Democratic presidential contenders, we incorrectly refer to Seth Moulton as a former congressman. He is a sitting congressman.

Logic: Logic & Chris Zarou

Corrected on March 12, 2019

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly listed the title of a Logic song, which is the phone number of the American National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. The correct title (and phone number) is 1-800-273-8255.

All Things Considered

Retired Military Officers Urge Caution In Proposed Diplomatic Spending Cuts

Corrected on March 11, 2019

A previous headline to this story incorrectly said that retired military officials were urging caution against a proposed decrease in defense spending. They are urging caution against a decrease in diplomatic and foreign aid spending. Additionally, the White House's budget proposal includes an increase in defense spending.

Morning Edition

It's 2050 And This Is How We Stopped Climate Change

Corrected on March 11, 2019

A previous version of this story misspelled Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's name as Ocasio-Cortes. Also, Sila Kiliccote's last name was misspelled in some instances as Kiliccotte.

Judge: Immigration Must Account For Thousands More Migrant Kids Split Up From Parents

Corrected on March 10, 2019

An earlier version of this story indicated the government had been ordered to immediately identify thousands more families. In fact, the government has been ordered to expand a class-action lawsuit to include thousands more families. However, in an earlier hearing, the same judge said an "accounting" of new class members is the first step towards a remedy.

Michael Jackson: A Quarter-Century Of Sexual Abuse Allegations

Corrected on March 8, 2019

This article originally misidentified James Safechuck as one of those who testified in Michael Jackson's defense during his 2005 trial — he did not. We have also clarified that Safechuck claims to have lied in a statement given in the 1993 investigation, while Wade Robson claims to have lied during his testimony in the 2005 trial.

'Jeopardy!' Host Alex Trebek Says He Has Pancreatic Cancer

Corrected on March 7, 2019

In an earlier version of this report, we mistakenly said Ken Jennings is the Jeopardy! contestant with the most wins and most winnings. While Jennings holds the record for most consecutive games won at 74, it is Brad Rutter who has won more money than any other Jeopardy! contestant. His winnings exceed $4.4 million.

Tuesday, March 5th, 2019

Corrected on March 5, 2019

In the podcast's discussion about Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's troubles, we mistakenly say that two members of his Cabinet resigned after the resignation of the attorney general. In fact, two Cabinet members have resigned. But one of them was the attorney general. There have not been three resignations.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Hardcore Muskox Hunters Camp For Permits

Corrected on March 4, 2019

In this report, we did not mean to imply that muskox are a crossbreed of oxen and deer. We were trying to make the point that in stature they are close in size to deer.

After Botching 2020 Census Contract, Officials Pick New Printer For $115 Million

Corrected on March 4, 2019

A previous version of this story described the 2020 census as the first online U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say it will be the first census in which all households will have the opportunity to reply online. In 2000, there was an online option, but it was only for the short form and only in English. The Census Bureau says 63,053 households were counted using only the online option.

Hurdles Remain As The Final Countdown Begins For The 2020 Census

Corrected on March 4, 2019

Clarification: A previous version of this story described the 2020 census as the first online U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say it will be the first census in which all households will have the opportunity to reply online. In 2000, there was an online option, but it was only for the short form and only in English. The Census Bureau says 63,053 households were counted using only the online option.

Previously posted Feb. 1: Because of incorrect information provided by the Census Bureau, a previous version of this story said the 2020 census advertising campaign is set to launch in November. In fact, it is scheduled to start in January 2020.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Officials Botched 2020 Census Printing Contract, Report Finds

Corrected on March 4, 2019

In the audio, we describe the 2020 census as the first online U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say it will be the first census in which all households will have the opportunity to reply online. In 2000, there was an online option, but it was only for the short form and only in English. The Census Bureau says 63,053 households were counted using only the online option.

Morning Edition

Census Bureau Stops Plans For 2020 Census Advisory Committee

Corrected on March 4, 2019

In the audio, as in a previous version of the Web story, we describe the 2020 census as the first online U.S. census. It would have been more accurate to say it will be the first census in which all households will have the opportunity to reply online. In 2000, there was an online option, but it was only for the short form and only in English. The Census Bureau says 63,053 households were counted using only the online option.

High Crimes And Misdemeanors

Corrected on February 28, 2019

In an earlier summary of this episode that appeared on the homepage, we incorrectly stated that Andrew Johnson was removed from office. He was not. Johnson was impeached by the House but not convicted by the Senate.

Unsung Economists #1: Sadie Alexander

Corrected on February 25, 2019

In a previous version of this podcast, we said Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman is a senior at the University of Maryland. In fact, she is a senior at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Morning Edition

Belgian Students Protest For Action On Climate Change

Corrected on February 22, 2019

In previous audio and Web introductions, we incorrectly said the European teens' boycotts were on Thursdays and that the Belgian students' protests were growing. In fact, the European students are protesting on various days, and the Belgian protests are in their seventh week.

All Things Considered

Chicago Police Say Actor Jussie Smollett Is Now A Suspect For Filing False Report

Corrected on February 22, 2019

In the audio of this story, the reporter incorrectly identifies the brothers who collaborated in the allegedly staged attack as Nigerian. In fact, they merely flew to Nigeria after the incident. They said in a statement that they are American citizens.

To Halt HIV, Advocates Push For PrEP Outreach To Black Women

Corrected on February 22, 2019

A previous version of this story said that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends PrEP to anyone at risk for HIV. Their recommendation is for anyone at "high" risk. The earlier version also lacked information on transgender women's HIV infection risk.

Peter Tork Of The Monkees Dies At 77

Corrected on February 21, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly spelled Tork's middle name as Halstein, instead of Halsten. A caption incorrectly spelled Micky Dolenz's first name as Mickey.

All Things Considered

New Election Called In North Carolina House Race

Corrected on February 21, 2019

A previous version of this story misspelled McCrae Dowless' first name as McRae. Also, a previous version referred to Marion Warren as a judge. He was actually a former judge at the time Mark Harris reached out to him.

Morning Edition

Coast Guard Officer Accused Of Being A Domestic Terrorist

Corrected on February 21, 2019

An earlier headline on this Web file incorrectly said Christopher Paul Hasson faced domestic terrorism charges. He was initially arrested last week on illegal weapons and drug charges, but the court documents described him as a "domestic terrorist."

House Democrats Plan Resolution Challenging Trump's Emergency Declaration

Corrected on February 21, 2019

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the emergency declaration would allow President Trump to divert $8 billion to the border wall. In fact, $6.7 billion will be diverted; the rest comes from the $1.375 billion contained in the recent funding bill.

Arrested Coast Guard Officer Allegedly Planned Attack 'On A Scale Rarely Seen'

Corrected on February 21, 2019

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said Christopher Paul Hasson faced domestic terrorism charges. He was initially arrested last week on illegal weapons and drug charges. In addition, we incorrectly said Anders Breivik was convicted of the Norwegian terrorist attacks in 2011. The attacks took place in 2011, but the trial was in 2012.

The Allegations Against R. Kelly: An Abridged History

Corrected on February 21, 2019

An earlier version of this story said R. Kelly was about to turn 33 when the Chicago Sun-Times published its Dec. 21, 2000, article about him. Kelly was actually about to turn 34 at the time.

Previously posted on Jan. 22: A caption on an earlier version of this story said Kitti Jones first spoke about allegations against R. Kelly in an October 2018 Rolling Stone story. She had been interviewed on the allegations for a July 2017 BuzzFeed article. And the interview with Rolling Stone appeared in October 2017.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Discover What The New Year Holds With Help From Tarot Cards

Corrected on February 20, 2019

In this story, Jessica Dore incorrectly refers to herself as a psychotherapist. She practices psychotherapy as part of her master's program in social work but is not licensed.

Morning Edition

'We Had To Do It Ourselves': Joan Jett Looks Back On Being A Conduit For Women In Rock

Corrected on February 19, 2019

In an earlier Web version of this story, we made a mistake about the timing of The Blackhearts' first record deal. The band independently released its debut album and sold it out of the band members' cars at concerts. Then, as The Blackhearts gained popularity, the band signed with Boardwalk records and recorded a follow-up album that rose to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. It was not without a record deal at the time that "I Love Rock 'n' Roll" reached No. 1, as previously reported.

FACT CHECK: Trump, Illegal Immigration And Crime

Corrected on February 19, 2019

An earlier version of this story failed to note that a Government Accountability Office study about immigrants who commit crime included data about immigrants living in the country both legally and illegally.

Weekend Edition Sunday

U.S. And South Korea Reach Deal On Military Costs

Corrected on February 18, 2019

The audio in this story, as in a previous Web version, incorrectly says Kangwon National University is located in Seoul. It is in Chuncheon.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Interior Dept.'s Push To Limit Public Records Requests Draws Criticism

Corrected on February 17, 2019

A previous chart incorrectly represented Michael Ravnitzky's affiliation when he made FOIA requests to the office of the secretary of the Department of the Interior. He did so as a private citizen, as the chart now states.

Airbus To Stop Production Of A380 Superjumbo Jet

Corrected on February 14, 2019

We previously said no U.S. airline had ever ordered the A380. While it's true that no U.S. passenger airline did so, freight carriers Fed Ex and UPS both placed — and canceled — orders for the jet.

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar Launches 2020 Presidential Bid

Corrected on February 11, 2019

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said Amy Klobuchar was Minnesota's first female senator. Muriel Humphrey was appointed to complete the term of her husband, Sen. Hubert Humphrey, after he died in January 1978. She served until November 1978. Klobuchar is Minnesota's first elected female senator.

Morning Edition

Controversy Surrounds Planned Hungarian Holocaust Museum

Corrected on February 7, 2019

In this story, we incorrectly say that all Hungarian Jews deported to Nazi death camps in 1944 traveled through Jozsefvaros railway station in Budapest. In fact, some did not travel through that station.

Morning Edition

Alabama Officer Cleared In Fatal Shooting

Corrected on February 6, 2019

In the introduction to this report, as in a previous version of the Web summary, we mistakenly say the police officer was from Birmingham, Ala. In fact, he is with the Hoover, Ala., police.

Is Beauty In The Eyes Of The Colonizer?

Corrected on February 6, 2019

A previous version of the Web story misstated the year in which the Miss America pageant changed a rule requiring that contestants must be white. It was 1940, not 1970.

3 Charts That Show What's Actually Happening Along The Southern Border

Corrected on February 5, 2019

A previous version of the first chart showed overall border apprehensions, while the surrounding language was specific to apprehensions along the Southern border only. The chart has been updated to distinguish apprehensions along the Southern border from those in other border zones.

Last 4 Children Detained On Nauru Are Heading To The U.S.

Corrected on February 4, 2019

In a previous version of this story, we dropped the word "illegally" from the quote regarding Australia's border policy for people arriving by boat. The actual quote is "No-one who travels illegally to Australia by boat will be allowed to remain in Australia."

Morning Edition

How Venezuela Arrived At Its Political Crisis

Corrected on February 4, 2019

We incorrectly say Hugo Chávez was elected president of Venezuela in 1999. In fact, he was elected in 1998 and took office in 1999.

Women Who Dare To Bicycle In Pakistan

Corrected on February 3, 2019

In a previous version of this story we stated that Karachi was the capital of Pakistan. In fact, Islamabad is the capital.

Morning Edition

Welcoming Girls, Boy Scouts Program Is Now Scouts BSA

Corrected on February 1, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the Boy Scouts of America organization changed its name. In fact, the Boy Scouts program, which is for older children, changed its name to Scouts BSA.

'Stop The Maduro Genocide': Protesters March In Venezuela With U.S. Support

Corrected on January 31, 2019

In a previous version of this story, we incorrectly said the State Department had on Tuesday granted Juan Guaidó the authority to take control of Venezuelan government assets held by U.S.-insured banks. The department actually granted the authority on Jan. 25 but did not announce it until Tuesday.

All Things Considered

The Women Behind The Songs: Jessie Mae Robinson

Corrected on January 31, 2019

Previous audio introductions to this story incorrectly said Elvis Presley covered the song "Let's Have A Party." Presley was actually the first person to sing it.

Wednesday, January 30th, 2019

Corrected on January 30, 2019

In this podcast, we describe the Kamala Harris campaign as backtracking from one aspect of "Medicare-for-all." Her campaign said that in fact, she remains supportive of the "Medicare-for-all" bill she co-sponsors with Bernie Sanders.

Morning Edition

News Brief: China Trade Talks, Venezuela Leadership, Medicare For All

Corrected on January 30, 2019

In an earlier audio version, we described the Kamala Harris campaign as backtracking from one aspect of "Medicare-for-all." Her campaign said that in fact, she remains supportive of the "Medicare-for-all" bill she co-sponsors with Bernie Sanders.

All Things Considered

'Does It Have To Be Him?': N.H. Progressives Split By Another Sanders Bid

Corrected on January 30, 2019

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly said that Bernie Sanders did not have staff in New Hampshire in the summer of 2015. Sanders did have staff in the state even before he declared his presidential bid in May 2015, but he did not open an official campaign office until July 2015.

Mailing Just Got More Expensive: Forever Stamps See Biggest Price Increase Ever

Corrected on January 29, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly characterized material from The Associated Press as saying that the 10 percent increase in the cost of a first-class Forever Stamp is the largest single price jump in the history of the U.S. Postal Service. In fact, the news service says it is "the biggest price increase by total cents" in USPS history.

Weekend Edition Saturday

LGBT Navajos Discover Unexpected Champions: Their Grandparents

Corrected on January 28, 2019

A previous Web version of this story incorrectly said the suicide attempt rate for LGBTQ Navajo youths was three times as high as that of non-Native LGBTQ youths. The rate is three times as high as that of white LGBTQ youths.

Steep Climb In Benzodiazepine Prescribing By Primary Care Doctors

Corrected on January 25, 2019

In an earlier version of this story, we incorrectly said there was an 830 percent increase in overdose mortality rates among women from 1996 to 2017. The statistic is from 1999 to 2017. In addition, we incorrectly gave Anna Lembke's first name as Anne.

Hear Weezer's Surprise New Covers Album

Corrected on January 24, 2019

An earlier version of this story misidentified the singer on Weezer's "Paranoid" cover as Rivers Cuomo. It is the band's guitarist, Brian Bell.

Morning Edition

Native American Leader: 'A Wall Is Not The Answer'

Corrected on January 23, 2019

A previous Web version of this story said the U.S. is home to 34,000 Tohono O'odham tribal citizens and about 2,000 tribal citizens live in Mexico. There are about 32,000 Tohono O'odham tribal citizens in the U.S.

Morning Edition

Sen. Kamala Harris Announces 2020 Presidential Candidacy

Corrected on January 21, 2019

An earlier Web version of this story incorrectly stated that Sen. Kamala Harris traveled to New Hampshire as she was preparing to launch her presidential campaign.

Thursday, January 17th, 2019

Corrected on January 17, 2019

An earlier version of this summary misspelled Laquan McDonald's first name as LaQuand.

Wednesday, January 16th, 2019

Corrected on January 16, 2019

In this episode, we incorrectly say that federal workers haven't received a paycheck since the partial shutdown started on Dec. 22. Paychecks were issued about a week later for time worked before the shutdown.

Morning Edition

In The Aftermath Of The Camp Fire, A Slow, Simmering Crisis In Nearby Chico

Corrected on January 15, 2019

In the audio, as in an earlier Web version of this story, we say Randall Stone became Chico's mayor a few days before the Camp Fire ignited in November 2018. And in the earlier Web version, we said he was elected mayor in November. He was actually selected as mayor by the City Council on Dec. 4, 2018.

Morning Edition

Bidding Farewell To 'Hello, Dolly!': Actress Carol Channing Dies At 97

Corrected on January 15, 2019

An earlier version of this story said Carol Channing was born in 1923. She was born in 1921. Also, Thornton Wilder's first name was misspelled as Thorton. And because of incorrect information from AP, a previous caption in the slideshow referred to the saxophone Channing was playing as a bass. It is a baritone sax.

The Longest Government Shutdown In History, No Longer — How 1995 Changed Everything

Corrected on January 12, 2019

In a previous version of this story, we said there were a half-dozen shutdowns during the Carter administration. In fact, there were just five. In addition, we said the 2013 shutdown lasted 17 days; it lasted 16 days. In a previous caption, we described a John Boehner press conference on Dec. 21, 1995, as coming shortly before a government shutdown. The 1995-96 shutdown began earlier in the month.

Weekend Edition Saturday

What's Driving Up the Number Of Deaths By Car Accidents?

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A Web intro to this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

All Things Considered

Al-Qaida Reasserts Itself With Khorasan Group

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly called the TSA the Transportation Safety Administration. It is the Transportation Security Administration.

Morning Edition

GM CEO Pressed On Handling Of Ignition Switch Defect

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A Web intro to this story incorrectly referred to the National Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Graco Recalls Nearly 3.8 Million Child Car Seats

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Walking While Old: Seniors Face Greatest Death Risk

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Double Take 'Toons: Safety Worst?

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly called the TSA the Transportation Safety Administration. It is the Transportation Security Administration.

Weekend Edition Saturday

Sorry, Mom: The Toyota Avalon Is The Most American Car Made Today

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story and caption incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

All Things Considered

High-Tech Rearview Mirror Can Curb Blind Spots

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

National Review: The Trouble With TSA

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly called the TSA the Transportation Safety Administration. It is the Transportation Security Administration.

All Things Considered

Unintended Acceleration Not Limited To Toyotas

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

LaHood Backs Off 'Stop Driving Toyotas' Remark

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

All Things Considered

Letters: Planes; 'Classic' Clunkers; Folsom Prison

Corrected on January 11, 2019

In a previous version of the Web intro to this story, we incorrectly called the TSA the Transportation Safety Administration. It is the Transportation Security Administration.

All Things Considered

The Day That Defined A Presidency: Sept. 11, 2001

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly called the TSA the Transportation Safety Administration. It is the Transportation Security Administration.

All Things Considered

The Dispute over Security Screeners and Unions

Corrected on January 11, 2019

In a previous version of the Web intro to this story, we incorrectly called the TSA the Transportation Safety Administration. It is the Transportation Security Administration.

All Things Considered

Highway Agency to Require Vehicle Stability Controls

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous version of and a Web intro to this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

All Things Considered

Minivans, SUVs Face Tougher Efficiency Standards

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A Web intro to this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Morning Edition

U.S. Highway Deaths Fell in 2003

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A Web intro to this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Morning Edition

Seatbelt Safety

Corrected on January 11, 2019

A previous Web intro to this story incorrectly referred to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. It is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Study: Coca-Cola Shaped China's Efforts To Fight Obesity

Corrected on January 10, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the percentage of Chinese adults who were obese had doubled from 1991 to 2011. In fact, the percentage refer to adults who are overweight or obese.

Where Does Illegal Immigration Mostly Occur? Here's What The Data Tell Us

Corrected on January 10, 2019

An earlier version of this story said the Border Patrol employed more than 23,000 people in 2017, more than double the number in 1993. According to Customs and Border Protection statistics, the Border Patrol actually employed more than 19,000 people in fiscal 2017, nearly five times the number in 1993. In addition, the story said that in fiscal 2018, the Tucson sector apprehended 400,000 people, a quarter of whom were unaccompanied minors. Actually, the CBP reported over 52,000 apprehensions in the Tucson sector in that time, 5,000 of whom were unaccompanied minors.

All Things Considered

Working The Holidays As An Amazon Worker

Corrected on January 9, 2019

In this report, Vox reporter Chavie Lieber mistakenly says federal law requires that employees be given breaks. State laws govern employee breaks. In the example given, Lieber was referring to Minnesota state law.

Nevada Death Row Inmate Found Dead In Apparent Suicide

Corrected on January 8, 2019

A previous version of this story incorrectly said Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt lost his bid for re-election. Laxalt did not run for re-election; instead, he ran for governor but lost that race.

Morning Edition

Making 'Surviving R. Kelly': A Conversation With Executive Producer Dream Hampton

Corrected on January 7, 2019

In the Web version of this story, dream hampton states that Elvis and Priscilla Presley married when she was 14 years old. In fact, while they did meet in 1959 when Priscilla was 14 and began living together while she was still in her teens, they were not married until 1967.

All Things Considered

If A Worm Makes You Sick, Can This Cup Of Tea Cure You?

Corrected on January 7, 2019

The audio version of this story incorrectly refers to snails as crustaceans. Snails are in fact part of the mollusk family, along with slugs, clams, mussels and octopuses.

JonBenét Ramsey's Brother Settles Defamation Lawsuit With CBS

Corrected on January 5, 2019

An earlier version of this story said JonBenét Ramsey's parents received a formal apology from the Boulder County district attorney in 2008. The letter, which mentions both parents and their son, was addressed to father John Ramsey. JonBenét's mother, Patsy Ramsey, had died two years earlier.

7 Killed In Fiery Florida Wreck, Including 5 Children Headed To Disney World

Corrected on January 5, 2019

An earlier version of this story said that the injured pregnant woman had given birth, based on an earlier statement from Kevin Cox of the Louisiana district of the United Pentecostal Church International. In an updated post, he says the woman hasn't yet given birth, but she and her unborn child are in stable condition.

All Things Considered

Devastating Wildfires Force California's Largest Utility To Plan Sale Of Gas Assets

Corrected on January 4, 2019

An earlier version of this story gave a combined death toll for the Camp Fire and last year's wildfires in Napa and Sonoma counties. The fires referred to in Napa and Sonoma counties took place in 2017. In addition, at one point, we said the Camp Fire occurred last month. It burned in November 2018. And we previously said that California was one of only two states with a law known as "inverse condemnation." The state is one of only a few that have applied this legal doctrine of inverse condemnation liability to utilities.

Morning Edition

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

Corrected on January 3, 2019

An earlier version of this story stated that photosynthesis in corn and sugar cane is more productive because it doesn't rely on the protein Rubisco. In fact, these and other "C4" plants also use Rubisco, but have evolved ways to work around its limitations.

Thursday, January 3rd, 2019

Corrected on January 3, 2019

In the audio that is uploaded to this page, we incorrectly say the photo taken on the far side of the moon is the first ever to show it. It is actually the first such photo taken from the surface. Others have been taken from space.

China Becomes First Country To Land On Far Side Of Moon, State Media Announce

Corrected on January 3, 2019

A previous version of this story and a photo caption said these are the first photos ever seen of the moon's normally hidden far side. Previous photos have been taken from space. These are the first images captured from the surface.

In addition, Purdue University planetary scientist Briony Horgan's name was misspelled as Briorny.

China Takes Wind Out Of Apple iPhone Sales

Corrected on January 3, 2019

A previous version of this story and a summary on the homepage incorrectly said Apple was the first company worth $1 trillion. It is the first private sector company worth $1 trillion.

Morning Edition

Trade Wars Keep U.S. Farmers' Chickpeas In Silos

Corrected on January 3, 2019

In this report, we incorrectly say that the U.S. pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership "earlier this year." The correct year is 2017, not 2018.

All Things Considered

For One Violinist, Elevating Music By Black Composers Is A 20-Year Mission

Corrected on January 3, 2019

In this report, we state that Billy Childs "got a cold dose of how the classical establishment feels about composers of color when he went to the University of California." Childs said during an interview with NPR that he became "aware of race in music" when he studied composition at USC. But since this story aired, he has clarified that he encountered racism in the music world after graduating from the school, not while he was a student there.

Chickpeas Sit In Silos As Trump's Trade Wars Wage On

Corrected on January 3, 2019

In the audio, as in a previous Web version of this story, we incorrectly say that the U.S. pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership in 2018. The correct year is 2017. Also, the Web version has been updated to say that India imposed a global tariff on pulse crops and other farm products in late 2017.

NASA Probe Sends Pictures Of An Object 4 Billion Miles From The Sun

Corrected on January 1, 2019

An earlier version of this story inaccurately described Ultima Thule as a planet in the story and headline. It is not a planet but a "minor planet," and is one of the small objects that make up the Kuiper belt, a ring of icy objects at the outskirts of our solar system.