India To Unveil Inexpensive Laptop Prototype The Indian government on Tuesday is expected to introduce a computer laptop prototype that runs on low power, has wireless Internet and costs $20 to manufacture. One goal is to bring computers to the developing world. The price is lower than the much-publicized project of One Laptop Per Child, a U.S.-based organization that aims to get $100 laptops in the hands of poor students around the globe.
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India To Unveil Inexpensive Laptop Prototype

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India To Unveil Inexpensive Laptop Prototype

India To Unveil Inexpensive Laptop Prototype

India To Unveil Inexpensive Laptop Prototype

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The Indian government on Tuesday is expected to introduce a computer laptop prototype that runs on low power, has wireless Internet and costs $20 to manufacture. One goal is to bring computers to the developing world. The price is lower than the much-publicized project of One Laptop Per Child, a U.S.-based organization that aims to get $100 laptops in the hands of poor students around the globe.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's Business News starts with a $20 laptop. First, India announced the $2,000 car; now, it's unveiling an ultra-cheap laptop computer. Tomorrow, the Indian government will introduce a prototype that runs on low power, has wireless Internet, and costs a mere $20 to manufacture. One of goals is to connect India's 18,000 colleges. The price is much lower than the much-publicized One Laptop Per Child project. That's the U.S.-based organization that aims to sell $100 laptops to poor students around the globe.

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