Donut Shop Employee Makes Poor Stab At Service A Massachusetts man wanted coffee at Dunkin' Donuts. After waiting a while, he began arguing with employee Thomas Zazulak. It's not clear what words were exchanged, but the men didn't sit down and discuss things over coffee. Police say the employee followed the customer outside and slashed his tires with a folding knife.
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Donut Shop Employee Makes Poor Stab At Service

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Donut Shop Employee Makes Poor Stab At Service

Donut Shop Employee Makes Poor Stab At Service

Donut Shop Employee Makes Poor Stab At Service

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A Massachusetts man wanted coffee at Dunkin' Donuts. After waiting a while, he began arguing with employee Thomas Zazulak. It's not clear what words were exchanged, but the men didn't sit down and discuss things over coffee. Police say the employee followed the customer outside and slashed his tires with a folding knife.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A Massachusetts man wanted coffee at Dunkin' Donuts. It didn't come soon enough, so he started to leave, and argued with store employee Thomas Zazulak. We don't know what words were exchanged. We do know they didn't sit down and discuss things over coffee. Police say the employee followed the customer outside and slashed his tires with a folding knife. Mr. Zazulak has pleaded not guilty to acting as if the shop was called Dunkin' Daggers.

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