Energy Drink 'Cocaine' Has Short Shelf Life Makers of an energy drink with more caffeine than a large cup of coffee branded it as Cocaine — until the FDA stepped in. Cans of the drink, marketed as "Speed in a Can," were pulled from stores this week. The firm will have to sell the drink under a new name.
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Energy Drink 'Cocaine' Has Short Shelf Life

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Energy Drink 'Cocaine' Has Short Shelf Life

Energy Drink 'Cocaine' Has Short Shelf Life

Energy Drink 'Cocaine' Has Short Shelf Life

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10108220/10108222" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Makers of an energy drink with more caffeine than a large cup of coffee branded it as Cocaine — until the FDA stepped in. Cans of the drink, marketed as "Speed in a Can," were pulled from stores this week. The firm will have to sell the drink under a new name.

REBECCA ROBERTS, host:

Now, here's a company that could probably use a public relations advice: the makers of an energy drink called Cocaine.

That's our last word in business today: Cocaine, the brand name. The drink contains over 1,000 milligrams of caffeine - more than a large cup of coffee. The drink's label describes it as speed in a can and liquid cocaine, which explains why it was pulled from stores this week.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The Food and Drug Administration warned the company it was illegally marketing a, quote, "street drug alternative". The FDA critiqued it, even though Cocaine contains no actual narcotics. And a company spokesperson says the Cocaine energy drink was intended to be a legal alternative to drugs, quote, "the same way that celibacy is intended to be an alternative to premarital sex."

Since the FDA does not see it that way, the firm will have to sell the drink under a new name for now. We do not know what the name will be, but the company's Web site says Cocaine - banned by the man.

Still available under the original name, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

ROBERTS: And I'm Rebecca Roberts.

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