Vidders Talk Back To Their Pop-Culture Muses Fans of TV shows have long found ways to share their obsessions. But in the digital age, these vidders are creating more elaborate content, and sharing it more widely.
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Vidders Talk Back To Their Pop-Culture Muses

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Vidders Talk Back To Their Pop-Culture Muses

Vidders Talk Back To Their Pop-Culture Muses

Vidders Talk Back To Their Pop-Culture Muses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101154811/101166642" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The vidder Lim combined footage from many different films and television shows, including this shot from V for Vendetta, to create the video "Us." Lim/California Museum of Photography hide caption

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Lim/California Museum of Photography

The vidder Lim combined footage from many different films and television shows, including this shot from V for Vendetta, to create the video "Us."

Lim/California Museum of Photography

In another image from the fanvid "Us", Lim alters an iconic shot of Batman's bat signal so it appears as a copyright symbol. Lim/California Museum of Photography hide caption

toggle caption
Lim/California Museum of Photography

In another image from the fanvid "Us", Lim alters an iconic shot of Batman's bat signal so it appears as a copyright symbol.

Lim/California Museum of Photography

This image, taken from Lim's video "Us", renders footage from Star Trek in a sketchy style. Lim/California Museum of Photography hide caption

toggle caption
Lim/California Museum of Photography

This image, taken from Lim's video "Us", renders footage from Star Trek in a sketchy style.

Lim/California Museum of Photography