S.C. School In Obama Speech Needs New Site President Barack Obama's speech Tuesday to Congress contained references to the state of disrepair of a school in Dillon, S.C. Ray Rogers, superintendent of Dillon School District Two, discusses how the school stands to benefit from the stimulus plan.
NPR logo

S.C. School In Obama Speech Needs New Site

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101158656/101150109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
S.C. School In Obama Speech Needs New Site

S.C. School In Obama Speech Needs New Site

S.C. School In Obama Speech Needs New Site

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101158656/101150109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Barack Obama's speech Tuesday to Congress contained references to the state of disrepair of J.V. Martin Junior High School in Dillon, S.C.

Ty'Sheoma Bethea, a student at J.V. Martin, wrote to Congress describing the abysmal conditions at the school: leaky ceilings, peeling paint and interruptions many times a day from trains barreling by her classroom.

Ray Rogers, superintendent of Dillon School District Two, says it's time to start over.

"You know, after a while these old buildings, you can renovate them, try to bring them up to date, but they are still old buildings," Rogers tells NPR's Melissa Block. "We just need a new site. We need a new school."