Life On The Streets: Miracle's Story At 21, Miracle Draven is a crystal meth abuser who has lived on the streets of Portland, Ore. for the past four years. Independent producer Dmae Roberts brings us this story about a day in the life of Miracle.
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Life On The Streets: Miracle's Story

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Life On The Streets: Miracle's Story

Life On The Streets: Miracle's Story

Life On The Streets: Miracle's Story

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At 21, Miracle Draven is a crystal meth abuser who has lived on the streets of Portland, Ore. for the past four years. Independent producer Dmae Roberts brings us this story about a day in the life of Miracle.

ALEX COHEN, Host:

From NPR News, it's Day to Day. At any given time, about 1,000 kids are homeless and living on the streets in downtown Portland, Oregon. They can be driven to the streets because of physical or sexual abuse at home, or because their parents don't accept their sexual identity, or maybe they're addicted to drugs or alcohol. In the case of 21-year-old Miracle Draven, it was all of the above, and more, that put her on the streets for the past four years. Here's Miracle.

MIRACLE DRAVEN: Bitch about what food we didn't want to eat...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

DRAVEN: A squat is basically - it's like camping...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

DRAVEN: You know, like, you could sleep on concrete every day in your life, and if you try to sleep on a warm bed, you wouldn't be able to sleep because it's not cold.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

COHEN: Our story, Miracle on the Streets, came to us from independent producer Dmae Roberts and the NPR program Hearing Voices.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

COHEN: Coming up in the program, we switch gears a bit and get funny with "Saturday Night Live's" Andy Samberg. Samberg and two other very funny dudes are the band Lonely Island. They have a new album; it's called "Incredibad." Maybe that means songs so bad that they're good. Our critic Andrew Wallenstein brings us a review. That's coming up later on in the program.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

COHEN: Day to Day returns in a moment.

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