Small-Business Owners Face Glut Of Job Seekers The job of hiring new workers has become overwhelming for some small-business owners, who are facing no shortage of applicants. The executive director of an animal shelter in Michigan had to turn down an applicant with a law degree for a job as a pooper-scooper.
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Small-Business Owners Face Glut Of Job Seekers

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Small-Business Owners Face Glut Of Job Seekers

Small-Business Owners Face Glut Of Job Seekers

Small-Business Owners Face Glut Of Job Seekers

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101356902/101356865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Debra Carmody, the executive director of the Cascade Humane Society in Jackson, Mich., is popular right now.

Jobs are scarce in Michigan and the state's unemployment rate of 10.6 percent is the highest in the nation.

"They almost all had college degrees, many of them had master's degrees," Carmody says of those applying for jobs at her animal shelter. "There were two or three former executive directors of nonprofits.

"The one that really blew me away was we had one attorney."

There aren't very many openings for lawyers or anyone else in the community. Carmody says it is tough to say no to so many people.

Vincent Duffy reports for Michigan Radio.